NOVEMBER ON TCM

November on TCM is upon us and as usual, they’re showing a few Lee Marvin gems. Maybe not as much as some months but there is always something worth watching in which he appears or has a connection to a given film. Regular readers here (if there are any!) know that my intention of this blog is to of course t encourage folks to read and discover my book Lee Marvin Point Blank. So coupled with that is to equally encourage folks to discover his films. With that in mind, I’ll be starting off each month with notification of his films or films he was connect with here on this site. First up, November on TCM. All times are PST:

I Died a Thousand Times airs Monday, November, 2, 10:30pm:

Ad art for I DIED A THOUSAND TIMES featuring a cowering Lee Marvin.


Since Shelley Winters is November’s “Star of the Month” on TCM, they’ll be showing her costarring with Jack Palance in this lush looking remake of High Sierra (194?). The original helped make Humphrey Bogart a breakout star and I guess Palance was hoping for the same. He did a few more sympathetic leads in the 1950s (The Big Knife, Attack!), but then quickly returned to villainous costarring status. A rare exception was his poignant turn as Lee Marvin’s buddy in Monte Walsh (1970) but Marvin had the lead that time. So, check out their earlier teaming in which Marvin plays second banana to Palance as his tough acting yet ultimately cowering henchman. More factoids about it were plumbed here.

Point Blank airs Saturday, November, 7, at 1:30pm.

The better ad art for POINT BLANK’s video release as opposed to the film’s original poster.


 






Considered the first “arthouse action film,” this stylized John Boorman thriller was largely ignored when first released but has since become a recognized classic of the genre, and with good reason. One of Lee Marvin’s first major starring vehicles is clearly also one of his best. It’s also the reason why I used it as my book’s subtitle as I explain in the introduction. If you haven’t seen the film, or even if you have, check it out again and be reminded of Lee Marvin’s gritty brilliance. Read more about it here.

The Dirty Dozen airs Wednesday, November, 11, at 11 am. 

Composite of scenes from the TCM perennial, THE DIRY DOZEN.

If Ted Turner and the good folks at TCM have a perennial favorite other than Gone With the Wind (1939), it must be The Dirty Dozen. It’s airing again as part of the Veteran’s Day line-up of classic war films and the testosterone driven classic still holds up no matter how many times you see it. The all-star male cast is one of the best ever and director Robert Aldrich gets them all to deliver the goods. No wonder TCM programmers like it so much. How much? Check this out

Honorable mentions:
Ride the High Country (1962) Sam Peckinpah’s best film besides The Wild Bunch (1969) airs November 6 and as a friend, drinking buddy and rival of Lee Marvin, it’s a definite must-see. 
Others worth viewing that Marvin doesn’t appear in this month but bears import in the man’s life and work are: the original High Sierra (11/4 & 11/29), The Hurt Locker (11/10) The Snows of Kilimanjaro (11/12), Brother Orchid (11/14), and Kiss Me, Deadly (11/21). Read Lee Marvin: Point Blank to find out their importance. Check local listing for airtime.
So there you have it! November on TCM for Lee Marvin fans. More to come next month and until then, stay safe!

– Dwayne Epstein

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ROGER FRISTOE INTERVIEW WITH LEE MARVIN

Roger Fristoe, insightful freelancer for Turner Classic Movies (TCM) contacted me a while back when I had blogged about Raintree County. At the time I hadn’t known Roger very well but have since gotten to him better via Facebook. He had good things to say about Lee Marvin Point Blank so naturally, I had to get to know him better. Well, since this week is the anniversary of the opening of Raintree County, I asked him if he’d let me run the interview he did with Marvin back in 1986 for The Courier-Journal in Louisville, KY, and he agreed.
The opening before the piece is the e-mail response I’ve included here to give a little more interesting background to Marvin’s performance. Here then, in all its glory, is the interview with Lee Marvin conducted by Roger Fristoe on the making of Raintree County

Sunday magazine cover for Roger Fristoe’s piece on RAINTREE COUNTY for the Lexington Courier that included the sidebar interview with Lee Marvin.



“Hi Dwayne,
The Marvin piece was a sidebar to the main story and ran with it. I thought that gave it more prominence. Something that didn’t get into the piece…I told him that I loved his reading of his final line, “I’m from Raintree County!” He said it was an inspiration of the moment as they were shooting the scene that he added that element of surprise: how could this son of Raintree County come to this end??? ….. ” I may have told you that I wrote to all the surviving stars at the time of the story requesting phone interviews, and he was the only one who called. I was quite startled at work that day to pick up the phone and hear that booming voice: “Hey Roger, it’s Lee Marvin, what can I do for you?”

   Hope you enjoy — all the best, Roger Fristoe”
 
Lee Marvin Remembers
“Raintree County” – and Kentucky
“‘Raintree County was the last big film of its kind from MGM and, along with “Paint Your Wagon, my only exposure to that kind of spectacular production you associate with the old days. I thought it was a great book and a great film. But Civil War stories haven’t done well in years, except for those two ‘North and South series on TV. [According to Lee Marvin:}
“Everybody was in love with Elizabeth Taylor. Even today, when you see her, she just makes you want to smile all over. But she and Monty Clift were locked into a kind of privacy that I didn’t really share. I wasn’t really a noted actor at that time and have never been a leading man in the sense of people climbing all over you and tearing your clothes off. In Danville, I immediately mixed in with the locals with no problem.
“My memory now is not so much the film as those people who were so generous and so conducive to making us feel at home there in Kentucky. And, for God’s sake, this was a Yankee story! Now, Kentucky may have been a border state during the Civil War, but it leaned toward the South, right? I got a great kick out of the whole business of all those Rebs cast as extras and dressed in the blue uniforms of the Yankee army. I told ’em, “Look at it this way: this time you’re gonna win!”

(L-R) Lee Marvin and Montgomert Clift as ‘Bummers’ during the Civil War scene in RAINTREE COUNTY.

“You have an awful lot of time to kill between setups, and you’ve got to keep the juices flowing, so I spent a lot of time talking to the extras and helping them get into the spirit of the thing. When they marched by with a flag, I’d yell, “Don’t just wave it. Snap that flag! I’d get ’em going. And they were marvelous about it.
“My memories of the whole project are absolutely stunning. I kept my nose pretty clean, and the local people accepted me very well. They showed me great courtesy and made the location one of the most pleasant I’d ever worked on. It was amazing the things they did for us, the way they opened up their homes to us, the care they took of us. Everyone there was easygoing and accepting as long as you were genteel yourself.
“My mother is from Virginia, and she had brought me up to practice a certain kind of manners. When you do things in a cordial and acceptable manner, people respond in kind.” 

(L-R) Rod Taylor, Nigel Patrick, director Edward Dmytryk (standing), Elizabeth Taylor, Montgmery Clift, Eva Marie Saint, Lee Marvin, Agnes Moorhead and Walter Abel.


– Dwayne Epstein
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DIRTY DOZEN ON ICE SHOW HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR!

Happy holidays, faithful Lee Marvin Point Blank blog readers! And there’s no better way to enjoy the holidays than with an ice show…Lee Marvin style. What’s that? You say you’re a devoted follower of the man’s life and work and yet never heard of his ice show contribution? Well, allow me to set the record straight for you non-believers.

You are not alone, as there ae others unfamiliar with the ice show spectacular known as The Dirty Dozen on Ice. It actually was the original entity of the classic WWII film, long before it was committed to celluloid. It seems TCM’s founder, Ted Turner so loved the brutal novel he envisioned an ice show spectacular not unlike the Ice Capades or Disney on Ice, but with a slightly higher body count by production’s end.

Auditions were held at Turner’ residence in Georgia at a secret compound hidden away from prying eyes somewhere in Atlanta. TMZ did manage to get some paparazzi pix, however, as shown below…..

Veteran actors show up at the secret compound’s audition in uniform, knowing it will help them secure a role. These finalist make the cut as Reisman tells them what their role entails.

With a veteran cast of more macho than usual skaters in place, a read-thru was conducted in which all the participants committed their part to memory…..

The entire cast pictured at The Dirty Dozen On Ice’s first script read thru.

Auditions and read thru behind them, all concerned dedicated themselves to the hard work before opening night. It was not easy of course, and some of the ensemble balked violently at last minute cuts made to the extravaganza due to length and possible exhaustion…..

Posey learns from Major Reisman that his rain dance has been cut from the ice show and he reacts accordingly. Luckily, Reisman’s skill with props on ice helps subdue the gentle giant.

Final kinks worked out, including the difficult finale at the Nazi’s High Command compound, dress rehearsals then began. Some of the cast of characters, who shall reman nameless, took it upon themselves to do a little fancy improvising during dress….

Sgt. Bowren shows off a little during dress rehearsal.

Executive producer Ted Turner utilized his considerable influence to secure an appropriate venue for the production’s secretive out-of-the-way premiere…..

Opening night marquee of Dirty Dozen on Ice at New York’s Madison Square Garden.

All the hard work apparently paid off, as witnessed by the audience’s reaction. It proved to be so successful, that fortunately, an MGM executive was in the audience opening night. He pulled Turner aside, made an offer, bought the film rights, and the rest, as they say, is cinematic history.

Sadly, the contract called for only one performance of the well-honed spectacle. It didn’t even get chance to compete with Disney’s Frozen. Luckily, some rare footage was recently discovered! So, without further adieu, I give you the rarely seen “Best of” footage of….. THE DIRTY DOZEN ON ICE! Enjoy and happiest of holidays!
– Dwayne Epstein

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