GAY ICONS

Gay icons exist in the movies and two of the most well-known worked with Lee Marvin. Since June is Gay Pride month (which not so coincidentally is also a theme on TCM for the month) I thought it a good time to comment on Marvin’s work with these two prominent gay icons. It’s important to keep in mind that at the time of these two actors’ greatest popularity their sexual orientation was NOT known, as it would have meant professional suicide. This fact of course allowed them to become major stars and sex symbols to their admiring fans.
First up, Rock Hudson, an often mediocre actor at best but a wonderful and legendary light comedian with a charming air when most befuddled. Marvin’s films with Hudson were not memorable in and of themselves but they certainly helped his career. Released in 1953, Gun Fury and Seminole both top-lined Hudson in rather bland performances. Something, in my opinion, that was often the case with him in dramas, with the sole exception being the riveting performance he gave in Seconds (1966). Gun Fury was released in 3-D and allowed Marvin to put on his resume’ that he worked with the great Raoul Walsh as well as a friendship with Leo Gordon. Other than that…

Seminole, on the other hand, actually had scenes in which Marvin and Hudson interacted — albeit, briefly — throughout the movie.

(L-R) Lee Marvin as Sgt. Magruder and Rock Hudson as Lt. Lance Caldwell in Budd Boetticher’s SEMINOLE.

It was simply another programmer for Hudson, but for Marvin it meant working with cult director Budd Boetticher for the first time, who would go on to cast Marvin in Seven Men From Now (1956), one of the actor’s best performances. What did Marvin think of working with Hudson in the overtly macho period films? I have no idea. I do know, however, that for a man of his generation, he had some surprisingly forward-thinking ideas on the subject of homosexuality that he expressed in Playboy Magazine.
As to other gay icon, that would be Montgomery Clift, the legendary Method actor who’s tragic life Marvin witnessed firsthand.

Lee Marvin (left) and RAINTREE COUNTY costar Montgomery Clift photographed by Bob WIlloughby.

Marvin had gone on record as not being a fan of Method actors as a rule yet ironically, he claimed two of the best actors he ever encountered were Marlon Brando (when he cared) and Clift. Raintree County (1957) was the film he made with Clift and was also the film in which Clift suffered a disfiguring car accident early into the production.

(L-R) Lee Marvin and Montgomert Clift as ‘Bummers’ during the Civil War scene in Raintree.

Marvin’s performance in the film is one of his best while Clift is naturally just painful to watch, no matter how hard he tried. That aside, Marvin had his own theory on the accident’s cause which will not be expressed here, as it is strictly hearsay. Luckily, the tragedy of Clift’s forced hidden sexuality and disfiguring car accident does not hamper his legacy as a superb actor, thanks to his many extraordinary film performances.
As to the Gay community in general, Marvin had several run-ins with members of the community on a personal level. One such encounter was hilariously retold to me by Marvin’s friend and costar Bob Phillips and concerns Marvin’s dedication to the USMC. Another concerned one of his children and both tales can be found in the pages of Lee Marvin Point Blank. So happy Pride, dear readers, and remember, Gay Icons may be everywhere but on film, they are often legendary.

– Dwayne Epstein

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ROGER FRISTOE INTERVIEW WITH LEE MARVIN

Roger Fristoe, insightful freelancer for Turner Classic Movies (TCM) contacted me a while back when I had blogged about Raintree County. At the time I hadn’t known Roger very well but have since gotten to him better via Facebook. He had good things to say about Lee Marvin Point Blank so naturally, I had to get to know him better. Well, since this week is the anniversary of the opening of Raintree County, I asked him if he’d let me run the interview he did with Marvin back in 1986 for The Courier-Journal in Louisville, KY, and he agreed.
The opening before the piece is the e-mail response I’ve included here to give a little more interesting background to Marvin’s performance. Here then, in all its glory, is the interview with Lee Marvin conducted by Roger Fristoe on the making of Raintree County

Sunday magazine cover for Roger Fristoe’s piece on RAINTREE COUNTY for the Lexington Courier that included the sidebar interview with Lee Marvin.



“Hi Dwayne,
The Marvin piece was a sidebar to the main story and ran with it. I thought that gave it more prominence. Something that didn’t get into the piece…I told him that I loved his reading of his final line, “I’m from Raintree County!” He said it was an inspiration of the moment as they were shooting the scene that he added that element of surprise: how could this son of Raintree County come to this end??? ….. ” I may have told you that I wrote to all the surviving stars at the time of the story requesting phone interviews, and he was the only one who called. I was quite startled at work that day to pick up the phone and hear that booming voice: “Hey Roger, it’s Lee Marvin, what can I do for you?”

   Hope you enjoy — all the best, Roger Fristoe”
 
Lee Marvin Remembers
“Raintree County” – and Kentucky
“‘Raintree County was the last big film of its kind from MGM and, along with “Paint Your Wagon, my only exposure to that kind of spectacular production you associate with the old days. I thought it was a great book and a great film. But Civil War stories haven’t done well in years, except for those two ‘North and South series on TV. [According to Lee Marvin:}
“Everybody was in love with Elizabeth Taylor. Even today, when you see her, she just makes you want to smile all over. But she and Monty Clift were locked into a kind of privacy that I didn’t really share. I wasn’t really a noted actor at that time and have never been a leading man in the sense of people climbing all over you and tearing your clothes off. In Danville, I immediately mixed in with the locals with no problem.
“My memory now is not so much the film as those people who were so generous and so conducive to making us feel at home there in Kentucky. And, for God’s sake, this was a Yankee story! Now, Kentucky may have been a border state during the Civil War, but it leaned toward the South, right? I got a great kick out of the whole business of all those Rebs cast as extras and dressed in the blue uniforms of the Yankee army. I told ’em, “Look at it this way: this time you’re gonna win!”

(L-R) Lee Marvin and Montgomert Clift as ‘Bummers’ during the Civil War scene in RAINTREE COUNTY.

“You have an awful lot of time to kill between setups, and you’ve got to keep the juices flowing, so I spent a lot of time talking to the extras and helping them get into the spirit of the thing. When they marched by with a flag, I’d yell, “Don’t just wave it. Snap that flag! I’d get ’em going. And they were marvelous about it.
“My memories of the whole project are absolutely stunning. I kept my nose pretty clean, and the local people accepted me very well. They showed me great courtesy and made the location one of the most pleasant I’d ever worked on. It was amazing the things they did for us, the way they opened up their homes to us, the care they took of us. Everyone there was easygoing and accepting as long as you were genteel yourself.
“My mother is from Virginia, and she had brought me up to practice a certain kind of manners. When you do things in a cordial and acceptable manner, people respond in kind.” 

(L-R) Rod Taylor, Nigel Patrick, director Edward Dmytryk (standing), Elizabeth Taylor, Montgmery Clift, Eva Marie Saint, Lee Marvin, Agnes Moorhead and Walter Abel.


– Dwayne Epstein
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TCM’S 31 DAYS OF OSCAR HIGHLIGHTS LEE MARVIN

TCM’s 31 Days of Oscar is an ongoing annual event for the basic cable channel and this year Lee Marvin is very much in evidence. As the schedule shows, there are a plethora of his films on tap. No less than a half a dozen Lee Marvin gems, that’s right, a full half dozen, for most of February. If needed, here are the air dates (if you want to set your recording device for viewing, check your local listings for times). The Oscars or nominations of each film are listed below. My source? Why TCM’s own resident guardian angel, Robert Osborne from his excellent reference book, 50 Golden Years of Oscar. Okay, ready? Here are the Lee Marvin classics being shown for TCM’s 31 Days of Oscar….

THE CAINE MUTINY (1954) Airs Wednesday, February 5th. Nominated for Best Picture (Stanley Kramer, producer), Best Actor (Humphrey Bogart), Best Supporting Actor (Tom Tully), Best Screenplay (Stanley Roberts), Best Sound Recording (John P. Livadary (Sound Director), Best Film Editing (William A. Lyon & Henry Batista), Best Motion Picture Score (Max Steiner).

Marvin & shipmate Claude Akins in THE CAINE MUTINY.

CAT BALLOU (1965) Also Wednesday February 5th. Marvin won for Best Actor and the film was a also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay (Walter Newman & Frank Pierson), Best Film Editing (Charles Nelson), Best Song: “The Ballad of Cat Ballou” (Jerry Livingston & Mack David), Best Score (Frank DeVol).

Marvin as Kid Shelleen one of 2-roles he enacted for his Oscar-winning performance in CAT BALLOU

THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967) Again, Wednesday February 5th. Won the Oscar for Best Sound Effects (John Poyner). Nominated for Best Supporting Actor (John Cassavetes), Best Sound (MGM Sound Dept.) and Best Film Editing (Michael Luciano).

Marvin confronts Robert Ryan in the Oscar-winning THE DIRTY DOZEN.

RAINTREE COUNTY (1957) Airs Monday, February 10th. Nominated for Best Actress (Elizabeth Taylor), Best Art Direction-Set Direction (William A. Horning & Urie McCleary; Edwin B. Willis & Hugh Hunt), Best Costume Desgn (Walter Plunkett). Best Score (Johnny Green).

Rod Taylor as Garwood Jones and Lee Marvin as Orville ‘Flash’ Perkins in RAINTREE COUNTY.

 

 

BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK (1955) Airs Saturday, February 15th. Nominated for Best Actor (Spencer Tracy), Best Director (John Sturges) & Best Screenplay (Millard Kaufman).

Most of the cast, excluding Anne Francis, Ernst Borgnine and John Erickson in BADY DAY AT BLACK ROCK.

 

 

THE PROFESSIONALS (1966) Airs Monday, February 24th. Oscar nominated for Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay (Richard Brooks for both), and Best Color Cinematography (Conrad Hall).

(L-R) Woody Strode, Lee Marvin, Robert Ryan and Burt Lancaster as THE PROFESSIONALS.

So there you have it! Further proof — as if any were needed — that Lee Marvin didn’t just make really good action films. He made some of the greatest of all-time! Don’t think you’ll be seeing any Jason Statham titles in years to come on TCM’s 31 Days of Oscar. Just saying.
And of course, rare behind-the scenes stories on all of theses films (and more!) can only be found in Lee Marvin Point Blank.
See ya at the movies.
– Dwayne Epstein

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