RAOUL WALSH

Raoul Walsh, the legendary director of countless classic films, was the subject of a wonderful documentary I watched recently on TCM entitled The True Adventures of Raoul Walsh (2014). I’ve always been a fan of Walsh’s work but had my eyes opened to some of the man’s personal experiences of which I knew very little, such as his friendships with the likes of Mark Twain, Wyatt Earp and Pancho Villa. 
 Those factors aside, it was the man’s plethora of films that has stood the test of time as he, along with a handful of others (John Ford, Howard Hawks, etc), were the pioneers of American action films. Of course, when it came to more contemporary action films there are the likes of Robert Aldrich and Sam Peckinpah.
   I mention these gentlemen in total because one of the things they had in common is that I believe Lee Marvin may be the only actor who worked for all of them, with the exception of Howard Hawks. So, imagine my pleasant surprise when the Walsh documentary included a late life interview with Marvin. He told a great anecdote about the man that was echoed later by the likes of the late Jane Russell and Tab Hunter. 

(L-R) Phil Carey, Roberta Haynes and Lee Marvin in Raoul Walsh’s Gun Fury.

The film Marvin made for Walsh was a western programmer entitled Gun Fury (1953)  that toplined a young Rock Hudson and Donna Reed, along with Leo Gordon, Phil Carey, Roberta Haynes and Neville Brand. What isn’t mentioned n the documentary was the fact that film was shot in 3-D ….and Walsh only had one eye! 

Original poster for Gun Fury that shows Lee Marvin terrorizing Donna Reed in the top left corner.


   Also not mentioned was the ingenious additions Marvin added on camera and, according to costar Leo Gordon, the ingenious pranks he pulled off camera. all of which are recounted in Lee Marvin Point Blank. 

   Of course,the post-civil war revenge tale of Gun Fury is not one of anybody’s more impressive works but the fact it was made at all certainly looked good on Marvin’s resume’. 

The highlight of the Raoul Walsh documentary for me was the better films he made with such stalwart Warner Brothers stars as Errol Flynn (Gentleman Jim), Ann Sheridan (They Drive By Night), and mostly James Cagney (Strawberry Blonde, The Roaring Twenties & White Heat), among others. He was an original, that’s for sure and although it’s cliche’ to say it, the cliche in this case was born of truth: We shall never see his like again.

(L-R) Errol Flynn, director Raoul Walsh & set visitor James Cagney.


– Dwayne Epstein

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