MORE LEE MARVIN PAPERBACK TIE-INS, THE 1970s

The 1970s is now considered a golden age of American filmmaking as the studio system and production code became extinct and new filmmakers and revisionist ideas took hold. For Lee Marvin, that period was a mixed bag with a nary a hit film throughout the decade but several that went on to become bona fide successes with the passage of time. Monte Walsh (1970) for example, based on Jack Schaefer’s novel, found an audience years later but flopped when first released. Below are several paperback tie-ins from that very tumultuous decade….

1spikesPrimeOn the right is Prime Cut (1972) with Gene Hackman, a strange gangster/exploitation/action film that featured a mostly nude young Sissy Spacek and a whole lot of strange imagery. It has gone on to become quite cult phenomenon. On the left, The Bank Robber, retitled Spikes Gang (1974) for cinematic release that held promise but ultimately failed at the box office. Director Richard Fleischer explained why Marvin agreed to it in  Lee Marvin Point Blank (p. 204).

 

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1973 was a banner year for two quality Lee Marvin projects that just didn’t click with audiences for various reasons. Book versions of two literate projects failed to even take advantage of ripe promotion at the time. Instead, Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh was in print highlighting the stage version fro the 50s, not the Frankenheimer film put out by the American FIim Theater in limited release then remained unseen for decades.

On the right is a recent reprint of the original source material for Emperor of the North written by the actual A No. 1 himself pictured in the center with his hobo cohort Cigaret, better know as writer Jack London.

 

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Marvin attempted to recapture the fun of Cat Ballou with the 1975 AIP release of The Great Scout & Cathouse Thursday but with a much more bawdy attitude. The result was lost on audiences. Worst yet, was the film adaption of William Bradford Huie’s well received novel, The Klansman, a well intentioned project that proved a dismal failure on every level. Marvin does get to pull a gun on O.J. Simpson, though.

 

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 The downward turn continued with 2 films that were just a case of too little, too late. Shout at the Devil (right) was based on a popular European novel by Wilbur Smith but would have been more suited to the 1950s or 1960s as a film than its release year of 1976. Cold War spy thriller’s were also a thing of the past by the time the ill-fated Avalanche Express was released in 1979. It is not largely known that cult film director Monte Hellman actually took over the film when originally assigned directed Mark Robson died suddenly during production, as did costar Robert Shaw (Lee Marvin Point Blank, pp. 213-214)

 

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RARE PALIMONY PIX

It had to start somewhere and for better or for worse, it started with Lee Marvin. Decades before the high profile media circuses surrounding the divorces of Paul McCartney, Tom Cruise, Woody Allen & Mia Farrow, Brad Pitt & Jennifer Aniston, even before the unsavory murder trials of O.J. Simpson and Robert Blake, there was the media frenzy of the Marvin vs. Marvin palimony suit.

The media of 1979 didn’t have the internet or 24 hour cable news to report their findings. Instead, they laid in wait outside the L.A. Courthouse (Judge Arthur K. Marshall wisely banned cameras from the courtroom) to pounce on every possible sound bite elicited by the participants. While the media at the time constantly sought and received daily interviews from Michele Triola, her lawyer Marvin Mitchelson and countless court observers ( including Gloria Allred),  Lee Marvin: Point Blank devoted an entire chapter to the trial, covering it in a way that was not done at the time of the actual proceedings (pp. 215-229).  Lee Marvin, his lawyer A. David Kagon and others refused to kowtow to the press but Kagon and others did give lengthy interviews to this author to tell the story as it had never been done before. Some of the images from that time period were all the media got from Lee Marvin and they tell an interesting story, not having been seen since 1979…..

palimony1With his ever present cigarette in the days before smoking was banned in public buildings, Lee Marvin (above) is snapped by wire service photographers on the first day of the trial in January, 1979.

 

palimony2Refusing to comment to reporters, Lee and second wife, Pam Marvin (above on the right) patiently wait outside the courtroom for the day’s proceedings to begin.

 

free leeAn enterprising court watcher handed Marvin a homemade memento of the trial and a perfect chance for a photo op.

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As the lengthy trial finally began to draw to a close, Marvin surprised the ever present media outside the courtroom with some statements for the press. Part of his statement made the perfect title for the chapter in Lee Marvin Point Blank.

 

palimony4The trial over and the verdict rendered, Marvin was caught by reporters in NY’s JFK Airport as they jockeyed for a quote. Based on the smile on the actor’s face, the often misunderstood verdict was self-explanatory.

 

 

 

 

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