MEAN STREETS….TO THE RESCUE

Mean Streets to the rescue? Yes, believe it or not.

The poster for an upcoming film on the right as shown in Scorsese’s MEAN STREETS.


Once upon a time, in a strange time and place known as 1980s New Jersey, I was attending a film history/appreciation class at Mercer County Community College while working as a waiter near Princeton. The class textbook was “An Introduction to American Movies” by Steven C. Early and the instructor’s name escapes me. Good thing, too, because if he’s still alive and has access to the internet,he certainly WON’T like this blog entry. 
  What made me think of this particular incident was a result of some online research I’ve been doing for Killin’ Generals. It’ll make sense in a minute. I actually liked the class, being able to watch some classic cinema and write essays about it was my idea of fun. The teacher? Not so much. He was a stodgy stick-in-the-mind so set in his ways about cinema that if you moved his chair two inches in any direction, he’d fall on his ass. Example: The class final consisted of writing an essay on a given genre, choose a film to write about that proves its importance to the genre, as described in class. Well, I chose Film Noir as a genre and Scorsese’s Mean Streets as the film, with lots of info to back it up. I got an ‘F’ because the teacher said color films outside of the time period of 1941-1958 was NOT genre. I fumed, argued but ultimately got a ‘C’ in the class. Yours truly was not pleased. 
   Okay, flash forward a few years later to the mid-90s. PBS was showing a 6-part documentary series on American Cinema with one segment entitled….

Screen grab of PBS series devoted to American Cinema.




I enjoyed the show when it aired but more than anything else, the last 15 minutes of the show was pure redemption. The show, narrated by the great Richard Widmark, came to a point in which film ‘scholars’ decided when and why noir ended. However — and this is an important however — Widmark then intoned the following statement: “Some say that was the end of Film Noir. But I don’t see it that way. Film Noir was a look, a tone, a feel. The shadows are still deadly. Murder still stalks the streets. Love and violence still share the same bed. Fate could still put the finger on you for no good reason at all. Life doesn’t change… because people don’t change.”
 And then, the downbeat to the Ronettes ‘Be My Baby’ and the opening of…Mean Streets
 That’s what I call redemption! Or, as Scorsese himself says later in the program: “Mean Streets became a very clear attempt to do a Film Noir in color. What I was trying to do was blend what I knew as a reality, with that style….I think of it as Noir because I love Noir films. As much as possible, it’s my version of a Noir. But in reality, I was trying to get as much as possible, to my experience…My intention was, why not really show it?” 

 So there you have it.Thank you, Mr. Scorsese. I sometimes wonder if that instructor ever saw that episode. He probably retired with tenure and didn’t care any more. As for the ‘C’ average student? Well, he went on to write the NY Times Bestseller Lee Marvin Point Blank which has a more than few things to say about modern Film Noir. 
– Dwayne Epstein

P.S. If interested, the PBS show runs about an hour (with a terrific a opening montage) and can be seen on YouTube by clicking below.  Enjoy!

 

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MICHAEL DUKAKIS, ROBERT REDFORD…AND ME

Yeah, that’s right. Michael Dukakis, Robert Redford and me. I know it sounds strange but we all kind of hung out together once. Seriously. Okay, it’s a bit of a stretch so allow me to explain. It was the Fall of 1988, a presidential election year, and I was a student at New Jersey’s Mercer County Community College, long before I even thought about writing Lee Marvin Point Blank. I had made friends with the guy who ran the school paper, although I wasn’t on staff. When I told him about a rally for Dukakis that was scheduled on the campus of nearby Rutgers University, he asked me if I would cover it. I said I would and even took some pictures. He also said I could write it up any way I wanted so I did it as a sort of first person essay. Oh, and the presence of Robert Redford to a lowly New Jersey rally was a pleasant and welcomed surprise.
I tried to be as impartial as possible but I was an obvious supporter of Michael Dukakis. In fact, I canvassed for him door-to-door during the election in my neighborhood of East Windsor. Yeah, Bush, Sr. won the election and even took New Jersey, too. However, out of curiosity, I checked the precinct numbers after the election and in our little hamlet of East Windsor, where I canvassed, Dukakis won. Moral of the that little anecdote is not about bragging. Just wanted to point out there’s more that anyone can do in a democracy than merely vote. Just saying…
Anyway, below is my write-up of the Michael Dukakis rally where he and Redford and I all hung out one day. Well, kinda. I recently rediscovered the article and in reading it, numerous typos aside, I think it’s actually not too bad. Judge for yourself, of course. As for Mike and Bob, I still don’t know why they haven’t answered my call for a reunion in the last 30 years…..
– Dwayne Epstein

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