DIRTY DOZEN PODCAST

Dirty Dozen (1967) podcast came as a well-timed pleasant surprise. It proved to be the brainchild of the versatile Steve Rubin, a writer, director, producer and yes, podcaster extraordinaire. After having done a previous podcast a while ago, Rubin contacted  yours truly to ask if I’d be willing to do it again in which the subject would be a Dirty Dozen podcast to be done along with film historian and screenwriter Steve Mitchell (Chopping Mall-1986). Of course I said yes. 

Montage of images from The Dirty Dozen.


    I got to know Steve Rubin through the auspices of FIlmfax magazine. Publisher Mike Stein asked if I’d like to an interview Rubin following his publication of The Twilight Zone Encyclopedia which turned out pretty good. We would talk periodically and help each other with research projects as he invited to me to join him and Stave Mitchell on a previous podcast. There were a few false starts but eventually it came to pass and despite my overt enthusiasm, I think it came off rather well.
     The latest installment of Rubin’s “Saturday Night at The Movies” podcast is available for listening now and I think it also came off rather well. We ran the gamut in discussing Robert Aldrich’s classic, covering everything from its flaws, its cast, screenplay, and its lasting impact. I especially enjoyed talking about the contributions of Ken Hyman,  Bob Phillips, John Cassavetes, Jim Brown and Telly Savalas. I come off a little too much like a hyperactive fanyboy, as usual, but the points are all well made. Luckily, I not only got to share thoughts of from Lee Marvin Point Blank but also hint at what will be included in next year’s publication of my book dedicated to The Dirty Dozen entitled Killin’ Generals by Kensington Publishing. So, give a listen here and feel free comment, criticize or what have you. In other words, enjoy!

Pop culture podcaster, Steve Rubin


– Dwayne Epstein

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TRIBUTE TO NEAL ADAMS

Tribute to Neal Adams, indeed. I recently read of his passing late last month here and with the news, comes a great sense of loss. To say he was my favorite illustrator is an extreme understatement. I was fortunate to meet him once at the San Diego ComicCon years ago with some buddies of mine. I was reticent to approach him at first due to the rumors that swirled around him about how difficult he was to deal with. Turns out, that just what they rumors, he could not have been nicer or more approachable. Turned me into a regular ‘fanboy.’
   After some small talk, I broached the subject of a possible interview as I was then freelancing for Filmfax and Outre’ magazine. We exchanged contact info, I checked in with publisher Mike Stein and lo and behold, a 3-part interview with the master ensued:
Part I
Part II
Part III
I’ll let the articles speak for themselves as he was wonderfully candid and forthcoming. As to his work, allow me to show just some of the reasons why he was the best of the best. First, the Green Lantern Green Arrow first issue cover in color…

GREEN LANTERN/GREEN ARROW (issues #76-89) by Denny O’Neill (writer) & Neal Adams (artist).

 

 
































Pretty dramatic change of pace for comic books, don’t you think? Inside, the theme of the short-lived series was set early on with this graphic…..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the help of writer Denny O’Neill this series created stories and images that were the best in the business for their intensity, irreverence and most of all, powerful imagery. In the most famous and most controversial issue, Green Arrow’s ward attempts to kick his heroin addiction with the sympathetic aid of Green Arrow’s girlfriend., again in full-color…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And just to show not of all Adams’ greatness lay in his Green Lantern/Green Arrow series, check out this vibrant and moody color rendition of his wrap-around reprint  cover for Batman’s Ra’s Al Ghul series….
And speaking of Batman, Adams not only did the cover for this classic but came up with the original story idea in which the Dark Knight Detective pursues some bank robbers, all while battling the demons that haunt him over the murder of his parents…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But for me, the man’s greatness will always be in the GL/GA Series.  I don’t think I’ve ever been moved to tears by a comic book’s work of art, but Adams was able to do it and I’ll give you my favorite example. I included it in the interview I did but the lack of color does not do it justice. So, here in powerful color, I give you those images, especially the last panel…
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


So there you have it, my own personal tribute to Neal Adams, the man I considered to be the greatest comic book artist of all time. He once famously said, “If superheroes existed, they would look the way I draw them.” He not only was right, but with his passing, there are no more superheroes, in more ways than one.
– Dwayne Epstein.

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STEVE RUBIN PODCAST

Steve Rubin, a fellow retro film fan, recently contacted me about being on his podcast entitled “Steve Rubin’s Saturday Night at The Movies” as he would be discussing The Professionals, starring one Lee Marvin. 

Poster art for THE PROFESSIONALS.


  I met Steve through the auspices of my work for Filmfax when Publisher Mike Stein assigned me to interview Steve when his Encyclopedia of The Twilight Zone was published. It went well which you can read here.
Steve also helped immeasurably with several projects i worked on and consequently, a friendship was born. Okay, fast forward a few months ago to when Steve contacted me out of the blue about a podcast he had launched concerning films he wanted to explore and discuss. Since he had read Lee Marvin Point Blank he thought I was a good choice for a guest, along with fellow film historian, Steve Mitchell. 
  And now a confession: I wrote down the day and time to call in and like a complete schmuck, I got the time wrong and called in a half hour late! That’s why when you listen you hear me come in at the 28 minute mark. Oy! That aside, I also sound a little manic in talking about the subject, but I can put that down to enthusiasm for the subject… I guess. 
 Oh, and one more confession. I have been Facebook friends with Steve Mitchell for some time and though I do know him, I had no idea what n impressive resume’ he has, from working for DC Comics (my favorite!) to the cult horror film Chopping Mall (1986). I am definitely going to be in further contact with him!
 As to Steve Rubin, he e-mailed and phoned me last week that the podcast is up and available for listening, which I finally did. Here’s Steve’s e-mail to me…
“STEVE RUBIN’S SATURDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES – Episode 2 of my podcast is now up and clickable. See link below. Writer Steve Mitchell joins us for a spirited discussion of his 1986 cult film, “Chopping Mall.” Author Dwayne Epstein then discusses the life and career of actor Lee Marvin, which he encapsulated in his marvelous biography “Lee Marvin: Point Blank.” Together, we all wade into a good conversation about one of our favorite Marvin films, 1966’s “The Professionals.” Enjoy.”

And so without further ado, I give you Steve Rubin’s podcast
 Dwayne Epstein

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