MARCH 2022 ON TCM: 31 DAYS OF OSCAR!

March 2022 on TCM means the annual salute to the Academy Awards with their month long program of 31 Days Of Oscar. Previous years had TCM programming it’s Oscar show in February but the pandemic has moved the actual award show to March 27th, hence TCM’s showcase airing March 2022.
This being a website/blog maintained to promote the life & work of Lee Marvin, I’ve gone through the TCM schedule for March 2022 to highlight several films for both the potential and dedicated Lee Marvin fan. Of course, all these films won Oscars thru the years, while previous schedules included films that were also nominated.  Wouldn’t it be nice to include films that SHOULD have been nominated? If they did, then we movie fans would be treated to such Marvin classics, as Point Blank (1967), Hell in the Pacific (1968) Monte Walsh (1970, Emperor of the North (1973)  and more! Might be something TCM schedulers could consider in the future. By the way, Only one film listed below actually stars Lee Marvin so the reason the others are listed is explored to a much greater extent in Lee Marvin Point Blank.

Until then, below are the days and times (PST) of films Lee Marvin followers can look forward to this month. 
The Dirty Dozen
(1967), Thursday, March 10th, 3:15 p.m.

Composite of scenes from the TCM perennial, THE DIRY DOZEN.

I don’t think it’s possible for me to write any more about The Dirty Dozen than I already have….oh, wait! There certainly is more, as I’m in the midst of researching “Killin’ Generals: The Making The Dirty Dozen, The Most Icon WWII of All Time” to be published by Kensington Press on Father’s Day, 2023, so stayed tuned for that as I’ve already acquired a staggering amount of exclusive research that no one as ever seen before! 

The Longest Day (1962), Thursday March 10th, 5:00 pm.

Original ad art for the all-star production featuring an international cast for THE LONGEST DAY..



Producer Darryl Zanuck’s mammoth tribute to D-Day still holds up after all these years and the Oscars it won were well-deserved. Rarely known factoid: It’s believed that Zanuck wanted Lee Marvin for the John Wayne role but Marvin was briefly repped by MCA at that time and turned it down. Proved to be one of the myriad of reasons the actor went crawling back to Meyer Mishkin and stayed with him for the remainder of his career.

All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) Monday, March 14th, 5:00 p.m.

(L-R) Lew Ayres as the innocent your soldier with Louis Wolheim as wizened sergeant in Lewis Milestone’s anti-war classic, ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT.


The first and still one of the best anti-war films to ever come out of Hollywood, it was the only film to win Best Picture for Universal Pictures for many a decade. Lee Marvin is on record as calling it one of his favorite films from his childhood on. He was especially enamored by Louis Wolheim’s war-weary Sgt. and the way in which he cared for his charges. Marvin claimed to have based his performance in The Big Red One (1980) partially on Wolheim’s, as well as his own father, Monte Marvin. Check it out and see for yourself. By the way, frequent Marvin costar Ernest Borgnine played the role in a TV-movie remake.

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

Mostly in shadow, Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt battle big Barton MacLane for the money he owes them.


(1948) Tuesday, March 15th, 10:00 p.m.
Legendary director John Huston’s classic tale of greed among professed friends earned the director’s father, Walter Huston, a Best Supporting Actor Oscar and with good reason.  Why is it listed here? Well, according to Lee Marvin, it also contained one of his favorite realistic fight scenes ever put on film as I related here

Rashomon

Toshiro Mifune in Kurosawa’s 1950 classic, RASHOMON.


(1950) Wednesday, March 16th, 1:15 a.m.
In the postwar years of the early 1950s, the United Sates opened up the distribution of foreign films to America, forever changing the face of international cinema. A foreign filmmaker who led the charge was Japan’s Akira Kurosawa with a plethora of amazing productions starring Toshiro Mifune. Rashomon is listed here as some may know that Mifune was Lee Marvin’s favorite actor, mainly for his Samurai films. In this film, though, Mifune is a thief who commits a heinous act which is depicted from the various points of view of the people involved. As with many of Kurosawa’s films, Rashomon was later Americanized as the Martin RItt Film The Outrage (1964) starring Paul Newman, but with much less success. Mifune on occasion dabbled in American films but Kurosawa never did. He came close once with his original screenplay of Runaway Train (1985) which was eventually made by others. Who was his choice for the role played by Jon Voight? None other than Lee Marvin. 

A wonderful line-up of films for March 2022 are presented so feel free to check out the full calendar
Curious, in the current climate of international events, think TCM may show some Sergei Eisenstein films any time soon? I didn’t think so. 
– Dwayne Epstein

 

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NOVEMBER 2021 ON TCM

November 2021 on TCM is going to be terrific for us Lee Marvin fans. They’ll be showing three of his films and a plethora of other films related to his career. The choices may seem to be a bit of a stretch, but one need merely read Lee Marvin Point Blank to see it’s no stretch at all. The titles below bear this out:

The Rack (1956) Thursday, November 11, 3 a.m.

As Capt. John R. Miller, Lee Marvin perpetrates an ambush on fellow P.O.W. Paul Newman that sets the tone of the film.


Starring Paul Newman in one of his first films, Marvin costars in a small yet important role as a fellow Korean War-era P.O.W. who testifies during Newman’s court-martial for collaborating with the enemy. A similar theme akin to Marvin’s Sergeant Ryker (1968), the film is rather dated but does have its moments, due mainly to the all-star cast. Interesting trivia discovered by yours truly after my book came out but blogged about here.

The Dirty Dozen
(1967) Thursday, November 11, 12:30 p.m.

Composite of scenes from the TCM perennial, THE DIRY DOZEN.


A TCM favorite that is, like The Rack, airing appropriately enough on Veteran’s Day this November 2021. There’s not much more that I can possibly say about this timeless classic that made me a Lee Marvin fan and also hoisted him into the rare atmosphere of superstardom but as my next project suggests, I’m discovering fascinating, unheard of details all the time, so stay tuned!


The Professionals
(1966) Saturday, November 20, 9 a.m. 

The Professionals, 1966.


Not only one of Lee Marvin’s best films, but a solid classic in its own right, The Professionals deserves a much better reputation than its legacy suggests, which means no matter how many times you’ve seen it, you’ll want to see it again…and again, and again. Yeah, it’s that good. See for yourself if you don’t believe me and discover also some behind-the-scene factoids along the way.  

Below are some other films airing November 2021 that have an interesting connection to Lee Marvin’s career:



Out of the Past
(1947) Friday, November 12, 10:30 a.m.

Foreign issue poster for OUT OF THE PAST highlighting the male leads.


Considered by many to be one of, if not the greatest film noir of all time, Marvin would have fit in quite comfortably in this film, although it was made before he launched his acting career. Robert Mitchum stars as a man looking to forget his dubious past but his former gangster boss played by Kirk Douglas ferrets him to find his femme fatale girlfriend played by Jane Greer. Naturally sparks fly and soon all hell breaks lose. Marvin would be right in either role but I’d like to think he’d add and extra something in the Kirk Douglas role. You be the judge.

The French Connection (1971) Saturday, November 13, 5 p.m.

(L-R) Gene Hackman, Roy Scheider and Fernando Rey pictured in the DVD graphic for THE FRENCH CONNECTION.


Quite possibly the best 1970s cop film ever that once again, just gets better with the passage of time. Airing for the film’s 50th anniversary, Gene Hackman earned a well-deserved Best Actor Oscar as Popeye Doyle, a tough cop doggedly determined to bust the biggest heroin ring in NYC history. Based on the real life exploits of Eddie Egan (who, along with partner Sonny Grosso, had supporting roles in the films), it also won the Oscar for Best Picture. All well and good and all properly documented. So, what is it doing in this compendium of Lee Marvin films and themes? I recently discovered that Marvin was considered (among many others) for the lead role. Seriously. Would have been interesting but in all honesty, I’m actually glad he didn’t do it. No one could have been better than Hackman.

The Lineup (1958) Saturday, November 13, 9 p.m.

Original poster for THE LINEUP.


Based on the CBS radio and TV series of the same name, this obscure little thriller pairs Eli Wallach and Robert Keith as a couple of professional criminals looking to retrieve a cache of smuggled heroin. So, once again, why is it mentioned here? The film was directed by the underrated Don Siegel who often provided brilliance on a small budget, such as the similar-themed The Killers (1964) a few years later. Watch the relationship between psychotic Wallach and his mentor Keith and see if it reminds you of Marvin and Clu Gulager. If you do watch it, make sure to check out that slam bang ending!

The Treasure of Sierra Madre (1948) Monday, November 15, 1 pm and Saturday, November, 27, 2:45 pm. 

Mostly in shadow, Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt brutally battle big Barton MacLane for the money he owes them.



A classic in its own right, it also stands as one of Lee Marvin’s personal favorite films. And with good reason, as I showed in an earlier blog. Its reputation is well deserved but I’ll add my own two cents. I’ve never really been that big of a Humphrey Bogart fan, depending largely on the film itself. I thought the man came off rather stiff too often. However, when he played characters dangling on the edge of sanity as in The Caine Mutiny (1954) or In A Lonely Place (1950), then he was something to see. No where is that more true than his performance here as Fred C. Dobbs. It’s brilliant.

The Split (1968) Wednesday, November 24, 2:30 p.m. 

Someone forgot to tell Warren Oates to smile as this poster for THE SPLIT suggests.


Hot off the success of The Dirty Dozen, big Jim Brown reteams with fellow Dozen alum Ernest Borgnine and Donald Sutherland in this variation of Point Blank with a fascinating cast and premise. Brown is recently released from prison and is hired by mob boss Julie Harris (!) to rob a football stadium with cohorts Borgnine and Sutherland along with Warren Oates and Jack Klugman. As a typical 60s caper film it fits its time period but the sparks really fly AFTER the caper as the title suggests. Diahann Carroll is Brown’s love interest, Gene Hackman is a crooked cop who wants a piece of the split and James Whitmore is a psychotic sex criminal as crazed as any movie villain can be. Some cast, huh? Point Blank connection aside, check it out for yourself for that powerhouse cast alone!

So, there you have some cinematic goodies and thoughts about them that are airing November 2021 on TCM. Enjoy!

– Dwayne Epstein

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