5 WAYS TO CELEBRATE LEE MARVIN’S HEAVENLY BIRTHDAY

February 19th, marks the another birthday for Lee Marvin. Granted, it is what’s often described as a heavenly birthday as he passed in 1987. However, even though it’s only in spirit, there are some ways to pay tribute to his heavenly birthday. By the way, all photos shown herein is a just a small sample of the images in Lee Marvin Point Blank.

John Wayne: You shoot pretty good drunk.
Lee Marvin: Better drunk than sober.
-The Comancheros

 

 

  1. Get Drunk And Bring Out The Heavy Firearms: According to several sources, such as his first wife, Betty, as well as Keenan Wynn’s son, Ned, Lee did that on more than one occasion.The amazing thing is no one ever got hurt in the process. Sort of like the lines of dialogue between Marvin’s Tully Crowe and John Wayne’s Jake Cutter in The Comancheros. Matter of fact, if guns weren’t available, he’d resort to pantomime. Safer than heavy firepower but not nearly as much fun for him. Sure, the guns in the hands of a drunken ex-Marine might be scary but hey, would you expect anything less from Lee Marvin?

On the left, Marvin in costume as British Marine ‘Hallam’ in the Broadway production of Billy Budd. On the right, in Shakespearean garb while studying at the American Theater Wing.

2. Get Drunk & Wear Period Clothing: Marvin did it for pay in his sole Broadway appearance in Billy Budd. However, bet you didn’t know he was also well-versed in the Bard, did you? The training he received after the war at the American Theatre Wing included fencing, movement, and yes, Shakespeare, which he could quote verbatim. He did so even later in his career, impressing everyone during an improvised dramatic moment on location for The Big Red One. I don’t know if he was sober when the picture in Elizabethean togs was taken but he certainly looks like he’s enjoying himself. By the way, the story concerning his fencing class is a personal favorite.

Lee Marvin ‘s Oscar-winning performance in Cat Ballou included this hard-to-get famous sight gag,.

3. Get Drunk & Go to Work: Marvin’s professionalism was as legendary as his drinking exploits. However, tales of his drinking on the job were mostly exaggerated. There were occasions when work and drink did converge (The Killers, Sgt. Ryker, The Professionals). The specific scenes are covered in the book so you can see exactly where in the given performance it occurred. His Oscar-winning performance in Cat Ballou had one such instance, according to director Elliot Silverstein, but the famous sight gag seen here was not one of them. Got to read the book to find out, which also details how they got the horse to look ‘inebriated,’ as well.

A Jeep full of drunk Marines just before shipping out overseas, with Lee top center.

4. Get Drunk & Re-enlist:
According to director, John Boorman, Lee had done exactly that on at least one occasion while they were making Point Blank. It certainly wasn’t a new phenomenon as he admitted to doing it even shortly after the war ended. Not something to be advised for everyone, as Lee was politely turned down each time due to his disability status. Doubtful other drunk ex-Marines may be as lucky.

Lee battles SEINFELD’S Uncle Leo in Shack Out on !01.

5. Get Drunk & Start a Fight: Lee Marvin’s barroom exploits became so famous they actually earned titles like, “The Robin Hood Party,” 6-foot tall Black Helen, “The Vibrator Salute,” and “The Battered Banjo player Lawsuit.” Several of these debauches were more  legend than fact in terms of Marvin’s involvement, such as my personal favorite: The English pub that had the bad luck of being Marvin’s choice of celebratory indulgence for his birthday while filming The Dirty Dozen. Why is it a favorite? As retold by Bob Phillips, if it wasn’t for the 6-foot barmaid dubbed “Black Helen,” it’s doubtful Marvin would have gotten out alive!

Maybe it’s best to just get sober, take the pledge and buy the hardcover of Lee Marvin Point Blank. It’s also available as a Kindle and paperback with extra material. It may not be as adventurous but it’s certainly a lot safer. Besides, you can do the other five vicariously through Lee Marvin when reading his exploits. So happy heavenly birthday, Mr. Marvin!
– Dwayne Epstein

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MOVIE TIE-IN PAPERBACKS TO LEE MARVIN’S EARLIEST FILMS

Paperback Tie-ins
Ahh, Hollywood. If it’s ever possible to make a few extra sheckels via promotional ideas connected to a project, rest assured the studios will do it. A good example is the now quicky fading movie tie-in paperback, a former staple in bookstores, revolving drugstore book racks, bus stations, you name it!
Below are several examples of movie tie-in paperbacks to Lee Marvin projects even before he was a known entity.

heatviolent

Reissue covers of The Big Heat & Violent Saturday paperbacks.

Lee Marvin had important, scene-stealing roles in both The Big Heat (1953) and Violent Saturday (1955,) but you’d never know it from the pulp noir covers shown above.

 

Raintree County (1957) and the excellent Seven Men From Now (1956) also featured excellent Marvin performances but since he was yet to be established, his name are image is nowhere to be found. Author Burt Kennedy, by the way, wrote the screenplay for Seven Men From Now and would go on to become a noted western film director.

raintreeseven

Movie Tie-in Paperback covers of Raintree County & Seven Men From Now

 

msquadconfidential

Paperback covers for M Squad & Hollywood Confidential, featuring profile of Lee Marvin

 

When film success proved elusive, Marvin went to television and starred and co-produced the successful crime drama, M Squad. (1957-1960). The recognition resulted in such media attention as the tabloid collection shown above in which Marvin gave one of his most revealing interviews.

 

valancecomanchero

Movie tie-in paperback covers for The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance & The Comancheros

By the early 1960s, film stardom was still out of his grasp but he did make impressive appearances in the John Wayne films The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) and The Comancheros (1961) as shown above. Even his name was mentioned on the covers! Liberty Valance was an original story by Dorothy M. Johnson (“A Man Called Horse”)  but the paperback was novelized by the film’s screenwriter and frequent John Ford cohort, James Warner Bellah. Go figure.

 

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