30TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PASSING OF LEE MARVIN

This August 29th will mark the 30th anniversary of Lee Marvin’s passing and much has transpired in those three decades. Truth be told, much more should have transpired within that time period. The publication of Lee Marvin Point Blank in 2013 I felt was a worthy addition to the effort of keeping his memory alive but there really hasn’t been much else. If you look at the scan from my book’s back pages you’ll see there’s only been a handful of projects that are a result of Lee’s work & legacy.

From the paperback version of Lee Marvin: Point Blank.

Some of the highlights include the long overdue The Big Red One reconstruction in 2004; A tribute to his films in 2007 by the Film Society of Lincoln Center;  MTV voting Lee Marvin’s Walker in Point Blank the top 5 badass in movie history in 2009; Playwright Nick Zagone’s original stage play “Lee Marvin Be They Name” in 2011.
When my book was in production and my publisher wanted a little more back material, I came up with this idea to keep the actor’s legacy alive in the mind of the reader….

From Lee Marvin: Point Blank, my own idea of films Lee could have made had he lived.

After my book was published, the good people at the American Cinematheque, in conjunction with Larry Edmunds Bookstore in Hollywood contacted me about the possibility of running a short film festival of some of Lee’s films. The turn out surprised everyone as the event proved to be a sell out!

Aero Theater Schedule for Lee Marvin film fest.

Aero Theater write-up. Part 2

Flyer of the festival as put out by Larry Edmunds Bookstore.

As I say, the turn out was wonderful and surprising to all. Similarly, was the fact that Lee Marvin Point Blank made the NY Times Bestseller list in 2014 at number four! Everyone has been surprised. This being the 30th anniversary of Lee’s passing, whenever his name is mentioned since then, I keep hearing how surprised folks are that he’s remembered at all and then how great it is that he is remembered.
Hey, I’m not going to lie to you. I think it would be great to keep selling copies of my book but there’s another reason other than money. Want to keep his memory and legacy alive? Sure, buy the book but more than that: Watch a Lee Marvin movie and tell other folks about it. Believe me, you won’t be disappointed.
– Dwayne Epstein

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MASSIVE LEE MARVIN PHOTO SALE OF OVER 100 ORIG. IMAGES!

MASSIVE LEE MARVIN PHOTO SALE! Please be sure to scroll to the bottom to see ALL images and information required for purchase.
Readers of Lee Marvin Point Blank are well aware of the great photos found within its pages, so now here’s a photo sale to own ALL of my own original 8×10 film-related images for yourself! I have made every attempt to upload as many images as possible, but several dozen are still not able to be shown due to length and size of the blog entry. If a specific image is requested let me know and I’ll do what I can to send it privately.
What this is: All the images listed below are being sold in bulk. It is being sold solely on this website and not via Ebay or other venues for a variety of reasons. All images are ORIGINAL 8x10s put out to promote a given project for film or TV promotion and are in condition from mint to very good. An amazing feat considering most of these photos are several decades old! Descriptions in blue are links to previous blog entries in which the image has been posted with greater clarity. To viewer larger versions of each image simply click on the  image.
How this works: Any and all interested parties need merely reply to this blog entry at the bottom of the page. PAYPAL is the preferred method of payment but may accept check, money order, or Western Union all with seller’s approval. The reply will NOT be seen publicly as I am the only one who can approve the reply and I will keep all messages private and will also respond in private. Any and all questions, offers or comments will be responded to privately. All serious offers will gladly be considered but keep in mind I have set a necessary reserve price that I won’t be making public.
So, feel free to peruse the images below and make me an offer if interested. I’ll respond in kind. Thanks for looking and greatly look forward to doing business with you. Enjoy!
FREE PRIORITY SHIPPING!
FILMS: U.S.S. TEAKETTLE (film debut): 3
HANGMAN’S KNOT (1952): 2
GUN FURY (1953): 1
THE BIG HEAT (1953): 1
SHACK OUT ON 101 (1955): 4
ATTACK! (1956): 1
SEVEN MEN FROM NOW (1956): 1
RAINTREE COUNTY (1957): 1
THE COMANCHEROS (1961) : 1
DONAVAN’S REEF P.R (1963): 1
SGT. RYKER (1963): 2
THE KILLERS (1964): 3
SHIP OF FOOLS(1965): 3
CAT BALLOU (1965): 1
THE PROFESSIONALS (1966): 5
POINT BLANK (1967): 4
MONTE WALSH (1970): 1
POCKET MONEY(1972): 4
PRIME CUT (1972): 1
EMPEROR OF THE NORTH (1973): 1
SPIKES/ICEMAN(1974-73): 1
SPIKES GANG: (1974) 1
SHOUT AT THE DEVIL(1976): 2
GREAT SCOUT & CATHOUSE THURSDAY (1976): 2
AVALANCHE EXPRESS (1979): 10
BIG RED ONE (1980): 2
DEATH HUNT (1981): 5
GORKY PARK (1983): 2
DIRTY DOZEN:THE NEXT MISSION (1985) 6
DELTA FORCE(1986): 1
MISC: PING PONG W/ PAUL FIX & JOHN DEHNER (1960, APPROX): 1
MARINE AWARD (1963): 2
W/ MEYER MISHKIN @ LONDON PREMIERE (1969): 1
PARAMOUNT PROMO (1969): 1
1971 PR PIC: 1
CONTACT SHEETS: U.S.S. TEAKETTLE: 1 (separated)
MICHELE TRIOLA (Approx. 1960): 2
MONTE WALSH: 1
NEWSPAPER PALIMONY PIX: The newspaper I used to work for had a morgue file on the palimony suit with a bunch of pix of Lee and his wife Pam during the trial that the paper let me have for good. They are of varying sizes and include captions. I’d say about 3 dozen in all mostly in sepia tone (but not all) on velox paper as camera-ready images.
FRAGMENTED IMAGES: From newspapers, mostly the 70s & 80s numbering about 2 dozen with captions.

Four studio 8×10 portraits of Lee Marvin from the 60s and 70s.

Extremely rare separated contact sheet of Lee Marvin with Gary Cooper on the set of Marvin’s first film, U.S.S. TEAKETTLE (aka YOU’RE IN THE NAVY NOW). Images can be blown up larger and framed, of course.

Two extremely rare onset photos from Lee Marvin’s first film, U.S.S. TEAKETTLE (aka YOU’RE IN THE NAVY NOW). Top photo, Marvin is on the far right with headphones around his neck. Bottom photo Marvin is running second from left. Also pictured is Millard Mitchell, Jack Warden and Harvey Lembeck.

Photo set from SHACK OUT ON 101 with Terry Moore, Kennan Wynn, Whit Bissel & Jess Barker.

Photo set from SHIP OF FOOLS with Vivien Leigh.

Photo set from THE PROFESSIONALS with Woody Strode, Robert Ryan & Burt Lancaster.

Photo set from POINT BLANK with Angie Dickinson, Carroll O’Connor & Sharon Acker.

Photo set from SHOUT AT THE DEVIL with Pam Marvin.

2 Photo set from THE GREAT SCOUT & CATHOUSE THURSDAY with Elizabeth Ashley & Kay Lenz.

Photo set from AVALANCHE EXPRESS with Robert Shaw, Linda Evans, Mike Connors, Joe Namath, Maximilian Schell & Horst Bucholtz.

Photo set from GORKY PARK with William Hurt and Ian Bannen.

Photo set from THE DIRTY DOZEN: THE NEXT MISSION with Ernest Borgnine, Richard Jaeckel, Larry Wilcox, Ken Wahl, Sonny Landham, Jeff Harding, Michael Paliotti, Jay Benedict, Sam Douglas, Gavan O’Herlihy, Rolf Saxon, Ricco Ross & Stephen Hattersley.

Some but not all of the Velox images used by newspapers during the 1979 “palimony” suit that made headlines for months.

Two separate contact sheets of Michele Triola’s semi-nude modeling days before she met Lee Marvin. Probably the late 50s or early 60s. Images can be blown up larger and framed, of course.

A contact sheet of photos taken on the set of MONTE WALSH of Lee Marvin and Jeanne Moreau, as well as separate images of Ina Balin from THE COMANCHEROS on the same sheet. Images can blown up larger and framed, of course.

Smaller newspaper images from his various films kept on file for the celebrity columns in the 60s-80s. Each measure approx, 3×5, very much like a wallet size photo. Some have captions as shown above.

 

 

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1ST WRITING OF LEE MARVIN & POINT BLANK

True confession time: I was not a fan of Lee Marvin’s Point Blank (1967). The first time I viewed it, I found it slow and pretentious. Of course, like all truly great films, it grew on me with each successive viewing and has since become one of my favorite films in his canon. What helped immensely was the research I did while writing Lee Marvin Point Blank. However, film historian and good friend, Bill Krohn, also aided my appreciation of the film considerably when he asked me to help research a project he was working on…..

The cover of Bill Krohn’s French film book which translates to SERIOUS PLEASURES.

Krohn was commissioned by Switzerland’s Locarno Film Festival to put together a project in which several great film directors pick an underrated film to discuss, why the picked it, and was worthy of rediscovery. It was dubbed Serious Pleasures, a sort of play on words of Film Comment’s series entitled “Guilty Pleasures.” The choices were very impressive as Bill also needed help in researching and writing some background pieces for each film. I wanted to do almost all of them, but had to settle on a choice few, of which Point Blank was one, chosen by Wayne Wang (The Joy Luck Club, Eat a Bowl of Tea, etc.). My pleading with Bill resulted in being able to write about Woody Allen’s choice of Sidney Lumet’s The Hill (1965); Francis Ford Coppola’s choice of Marlon Brando’s One-Eyed Jack(1961); Clint Eastwood’s choice of Raoul Walsh’s White Heat (1949); Oliver Stone’s choice of Robert Wise’s The Sand Pebbles (1966); Kathryn Bigelow’s choice of Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch (1969); Jim McBride’s choice of Otto Preminger’s In Harm’s Way (1965); and Charles Burnett’s choice of Frank Perry’s The Swimmer (1968).
All great choices, by the way, and the joy I felt in researching them was the reason I chose this profession. Unfortunately, the collection never saw publication in this country and I had to be content with knowing my work was enjoyed by film fans throughout Europe…only!

The credit page in French for Bill Krohn’s SERIOUS PLEASURES with yours truly listed as a ‘Documentaliste.’

My research into Point Blank resulted in the following brief background piece. Readers of Lee Marvin Point Blank may recognize some of the documentation but there are a few choice nuggets that may be new. Find out for yourself below. Enjoy!


The highly stylized film boasts many technological advancements, as well as some of the most memorable images of its knd. The reverberating sound of Marvin’s heels echoing through the airport during the opening, or the juxtaposing of a brutal fistfight during a hip, should music riff still pack a wallop. Although it is not widely known, Point Blank is also the first film to mic all the actors individually during a scene, thereby incorporating a greater sense of intimacy.

One of the film’s best images of both violence and sexual power, as recalled by Boorman, was a collaborative effort: “It was Lee’s idea to shoot into the empty bed of the wife who had betrayed him. We were using blanks which give no recoil, so, Lee faked it, his arm whipping back a foot or more with each shot. It suggested the enormous power of the thing more than anything else could. Later, when we were filming on Alcatraz, we got some live ammunition and fired the big Magnum for real. There was no recoil at all. Lee grinned at me. ‘Our way sure beats the real thing,’ he said.”
The production, the first ever shot with extensive sequences on the then recently decommission prison of Alcatraz, was not without incident. The difficult task of obtaining permission to shoot on ‘The Rock’ was secured by promising government officials that the film would not glorify crime. Once that was accomplished, the filmmakers took over the decaying prison, shooting long into the night. One shot included a love scene between Marvin and actress Sharon Acker in what had been the cell of Al Capone. At one point, the production almost lost a script girl who slipped on an oil-slick barge into San Francisco Bay’s choppy waters.
At the time of its release, most critics dismissed it but some, such as Newsweek, wrote: ‘It hits like a slug from the .38 Lee Marvin uses as extension of his fist. It is highly moral violence with compelling photography.’ Point Blank has since gone on to attain justifiable cult status. The highly stylized camera work, coupled with Marvin’s raw performance has made it, in the words of film historian Leonard Maltin, ‘A taut thriller ignored in 1967 but now regarded as one of the top films of the mid-sixties..’
The female lead, Angie Dickinson, made a pointed observation when it was screened at the Los Angeles County of Museum in 1996: “It’s been taken to task for its violence but if you notice, Lee’s character never really kills anyone, except for a car and a bed. He really is a catalyst for violence, not a perpetrator.” Her observations gives credence to those film buffs who argue that Marvin’s character is actually the Angel of Death.

Title page for SERIOUS PLEASURES Point Blank chapter.

As for Lee Marvin, he saw the film in a different light. At the the time of the film’s production, the actor’s marriage was on the rocks while he was in a tumultuous relationship with then girlfriend, Michele Triola. “I saw Point Blank about a year ago and I was absolutely shocked,” he said in 1985. “I had forgotten how rough a film it was. That was a troubled time for me in my personal relationship so I used an awful lot of that while making the picture.”
Rarely has art imitated life so creatively.

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