DADS & GRADS? LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK!

Dads & grads have always had a special designation for Father’s Day. Why that is, I have no idea. Always reminds me of corny ads from my childhood to this day….

Not too imaginative, I grant you, but you get the point. At least such ads aren’t nearly as gaudy and off-putting as the ones for Memorial Day and President’s Day sales. What does any of this have to do with Lee Marvin? Well if it helps, Lee Marvin had a dad and also was a dad.

(L-R) Lee Marvin’s father, Monte, Lee, and Lee’s son, Christopher, holding the family dog, Liberty.

It may or may not be as well known but Lee was not a grad. He left school a year before graduation to join the USMC during the war and never did get his diploma. After the war he attended night school briefly to try to get his high school diploma but never finished any of the necessary classes.
However, in 1969, he did receive an honorary degree of fine arts from the school that would have been his alma mater, St. Leo in Florida. It had become an accredited university and as such, extended an invitation of an honorary degree to the Oscar-winning actor.

Lee Marvin, 2nd from right, receiving his Honorary Degree from St. Leo, along with then Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird, 2nd from left.

So, when it comes to such things as dads & grads, Lee Marvin sort of qualifies. Now, the bigger question is what exactly is the point of this blog entry? Well, if you’re looking for the perfect Father’s Day gift or a nice little something for the graduate in life, look no further than Lee Marvin Point Blank. Most dads are familiar with Lee Marvin’s work and are fans while most graduates can become a fan by learning more about him. Makes sense now, doesn’t it? Available on Amazon at a half-priced soon to be extinct hardcover, reduced price Kindle and trade paperback with lots of extras. Feel free to check it out. You’ll be glad you did.
Oh, and happy Father’s Day!
– Dwayne Epstein

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ARMISTICE DAY, VETERANS DAY & THE MARVINS

Armistice Day began Nov. 11th, 1918 when WWI officially suspended combat on the 11th day of the 11th month on the 11th hour. In time, the name of Armistice Day became Veterans Day in 1954, honoring all those who served in the military on Nov. 12th.
For the Marvin family, there was not a single military conflict in which the family ranks were not involved and seriously depleted, going all the back to the American Revolution. As Lee Marvin liked to say, “It’s my country. We fought for it, we Marvins.” However, since Armistice Day, began with the end of WWI, the involvement began a little closer in Lee’s lineage, which meant his father, Lamont Waltham “Monte” Marvin.

Monte Marvin in his WWI uniform.

Monte was a 1st, Lt. during the war and in charge of a unit in the 302nd Engineers stationed in France. He later served in WWII as a battalion Sgt, again in France, having resigned his commission. As he wryly told a reporter years later, “I was too young for the first war and to old for the second, so I ended up in both.”

An older Monter Marvin in uniform during WWII.

The Marvin men all served in WWII, with Lee’s brother Robert serving in the ground crew of the Army Air Corp. and Lee seeing the most combat as a Marine in the USMC’s island hopping campaign in the Pacific.
All told, the Marvins did their part to earn respect and recognition for their duty in the service. This being Veterans’ Day — and a very special one, as it’s the 100th anniversary of the Armistice signing of WWI — take a moment some time today and remember those who served. Their contribution deserves our thanks.
How to show that remembrance? One way is to read Lee Marvin Point Blank and discover in the actor’s own words via never-before-seen letters exactly what he experienced firsthand and how he really felt about the war at the time he went through it. You won’t be disappointed. Happy Veterans Day.
-Dwayne Epstein

Monte Marvin (left) and son Lee photographed for LIFE Magazine in the 1960s.

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LEE MARVIN ARCHIVES FOR SALE: 20 YEARS’ RESEARCH ON 1 CD!

Lee Marvin Archives? Yes, Lee Marvin archives. I recently completed archiving ALL of my exclusive Lee Marvin research material that I used for Lee Marvin Point Blank by scanning and putting it on CD. The eight full volumes of binders were organized chronologically and consists of at least a 100 pages in each volume. It was pretty labor intensive as it took me over a month and was well over a 1,000 pages in total! I did manage to get everything on one CD, though. It is a true must-have for any Lee Marvin fan  as I can guarantee you’ll discover things not seen anywhere else. ANYONE INTERESTED IN A COPY CAN CONTACT ME HERE OR VIA FACEBOOK. FREE DOMESTIC SHIPPING!
The computer folders breakdown like this, with samples below…

1. Ancestry & Parents, 78 pages: Family details dating back to the 17th century,

Monte Marvin, Lee Marvin’s father, being interviewed in the paper on the death of his beloved uncle, Ross Marvin.

including verified info on Lee’s great uncle Ross Marvin’s actual cause of death and his father Monte Marvin’s childhood reaction!

2. Childhood & Life thru 1965, over 200 pages: This volume is the thickest as I was not planning on doing more than one volume. Consequently, I squeezed in everything I discovered from his early life, all the way up to and including his massive success by 1965.

Extremely rare first page of 3-page detailed account of Lee Marvin’s time at the experimental Manumit School in upstate New York.

It covers and documents his childhood, school years, war years, postwar years, early stage work, early film work, ascent to stardom and his full-fledged stardom by the mid-1960s.

3. Films & Life, 1966-1970, over 190 pages: Emphasis on Marvin’s films from this period includes

A profile of Marvin after winning the Oscar in the local Florida paper near where he went to school.

interviews and profiles in every major magazine at the time, from Playboy to Coronet, and every periodical in between, large or small, and many no longer in print or available online.

4. Life & Films,1971-1975, 104 pages: Extensive coverage of the films he made via

A sample of some of the exclusives in volume 4 is this cover story from the now log defunct “World” Magazine.

various articles, interviews and foreign periodicals, many of which no longer exist.
5. Palimony & More, 1976-1979, 136 pages: THE water cooler conversation of the late

One of the many articles involving the palimony suit included the effect of this Jimmy Breslin interview that nearly brought Marvin up on perjury charges.

70s was the infamous palimony suit Marvin was involved in. Here are all the daily rundowns of the court proceedings as well the actual legal impact the case had. By the way, it did NOT turn out the way most people think it did.
6. Late Life Interviews1980-1986, 125 pages: The old warhorse worked less in his

One of the many late life interviews Marvin gave includes this cover story for Parade magazine.

later years but did give many fascinating interviews in which he whimsically looked back on his life and work.
7. Obituary & Legacy1987-1999, 114 pages: Complete coverage of his passing in

One of the many articles in tribute to Marvin includes this rarity on his motorcycle days with Keenan Wynn.

August, 1987, as well as his legacy among friends and coworkers.

8. Growing Cult Status2000-2012, 119 pages: Since his passing in 1987, and his

The Loft Theater in Tucson showing its tribute to Lee Marvin.

growing cult status ever since,  Lee Marvin is remembered through a variety of sources, from a small repertory movie theater in Tucson to Film Comment and MTV!!!

Feel free to contact me here for my information if needed, or to arrange payment via PayPal. You won’t be disappointed!
_ Dwayne Epstein

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