LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK HARDCOVER GOING OUT OF PRINT

A recent conversation with my publisher, Tim Schaffner of Schaffner Press, resulted in the discovery that when the Lee Marvin Point Blank hardcover sells out of copies, it will NOT be going back for another print run. Matter of fact, he told me that he won’t be doing any future titles in hardcover. as all titles will be done in paperback.
By the way, if you didn’t know it (as I didn’t until my publisher told me), when you remove the dust jacket, there’s a pretty cool graphic added to it by graphic artist, Jake Kiehle, that is exclusive to the hardcover. Sort of the cherry on the sundae as my publisher called it…

Hard cover of LEE MARVIN: POINT BLANK minus the dust jacket.

To put it more succinctly, once the hardcover is gone, it is gone! That, by the way, is not an entirely bad thing.  It increases my royalties as the sales numbers pass a certain threshold amount. Also, when the hardcover sells out, it makes it a bona fide one-of-a-kind collectible.
I’d like to be able to say that I was in a position to make some sort of promotional offer in order to help boost those sales but unfortunately, I’m not. I can, however, make another ‘kind’ of offer in an effort to boost sales. If you purchase the hardcover, I will personally send you the following: A sticker for the cover denoting the bronze “IPPY” award in the Biography category it earned in 2013, as seen pictured herein.

2-inch bronze foil sticker indicating LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK’S win of The Independent Publisher Book Awards in 2013.

Since I can’t personally sign every Point Blank hardcover copy purchased, I can do the next best thing. Another give-away I can offer is a personally signed postcard. I was on the A&E biography of Lee (back in 2001) when I was still diligently researching his life and was given these promotional postcards after it aired. I will personally sign and send one to anyone free of charge!

Lee Marvin, shown on the set of THE DIRTY DOZEN, on the card used to advertise the Emmy-winning 2001 episode of A&E’s biography of the actor, featuring the author of LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK.

If you prefer, I have a bunch of other postcards I can sign from a book signing I did at a northern California bookstore called Loveable Rogue that is no longer in existence, unfortunately. Of course, that would make it a collectible of a kind, as well. Just let me know which one you prefer and I’ll accommodate your request. Must act soon as I have a limited amount of stickers and postcards.

Front & back view of cards printed up for the “Loveable Rogue book signing in Novato, Calif.

 

 

The hardcover can be purchased on line on several sites but make sure you’re ordering the Point Blank hardcover and not the Kindle or paperback. Links to such sites are highlighted here in blue and you can simply click on it and it’ll take you right to it.
The price Amazon is charging is $14.65 which is 48% less than the cover but they’re low on inventory at present. Barnes & Noble is priced $18.95 which is 32% less than the cover price. The same with the Books-A-Million (BAM!) price.

  • One last reason to consider the hardcover. August 29th of this year will mark the 30th anniversary of Lee Marvin’s passing. Since he is no longer with us, I think there may be no better way to honor his passing than with the purchase of a book that will also soon no longer be with us. Just a thought.
    Anyone interested in taking me up on my offer can simply message me here as shown below. Thanks for looking and long live the memory of the great Lee Marvin!
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JIM JARMUSCH AND THE SONS OF LEE MARVIN

Picture this: I’m in the earliest stages of researching Lee Marvin Point Blank, standing in the middle of the public library, when I read the Film Comment article written by director Jim Jarmusch that reveals the first mention I’ve ever heard concerning the Sons of Lee Marvin. I was still slightly on the fence at the time about whether I should undertake the project at all, that is unti I read Jarmusch’s article.
Being a lifelong film buff I had read much about the legacy of film stars following their passing. The cult surrounding stars such as Marilyn Monroe, Humphrey Bogart, James Dean and others are well know to myself and the general public. Such reverence is often shown via film revivals, books and other venues. However, in all the years I have encountered such things I have never encountered anything as what Jarmusch talks about in his unveiling of the Sons Of Lee Marvin. It literally made me laugh out loud when he retold the anecdote concerning fellow member Tom Waits and the real son of Lee Marvin. I was shushed by the librarian and warned if I repeat the guffaw I’d be asked to leave. I acquiesced to the glares and stares of the other patrons but figured in my head, what the hell, it was worth it. My appreciation of Marvin expanded and my curiosity deepened. Quite simply, the more I found out about him, the more I liked him.
This article, by the way, was part of series in Film Comment in which film makers were asked to list their “Guilty Pleasures,” films they know are bad but they like anyway and with a given reason. Jarmusch dedicates one 10th of his entire list to his favorite Marvin films! So, without further ado, below is the original article that helped pushed me over the edge into dedicating myself to researching and writing Lee Marvin Point Blank.
Oh, and by the way, the story about Waits and Christopher Marvin is pure b.s. but sounds great, doesn’t it? If you want to know the truth, from Christopher Marvin himself. you gotta read Lee Marvin Point Blank.

The original article by Jim Jarmusch in Film Comment.

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MICHELE TRIOLA: MEN’S MAGAZINE CONTACT SHEETS

In researching and writing Lee Marvin Point Blank, it was mandatory that I deal with the relationship between Lee Marvin and his pariah, Michele Triola, whether I like it or not. In doing so, one comes across a pretty strange array of, shall we say artifacts? I would check Ebay regularly (among other sources) for any rare or hard to find info on Lee and came across the above entitled items for sale. Naturally intrigued, I bid on and won it, but when I questioned the buyer of its origins, he was very mysteriously evasive. In other words, I have no idea if any of the images ever saw the light of day or even who the photographer was, for that matter. The contact sheet was undated so any time frame is purely conjecture. I’m pretty sure it was before she met Lee Marvin on the set of Ship of Fools in 1964. I’d venture a guess that the pictures were taken in the very late 50s or early 60s.

“Oh hi, Lee. Yes, I was just going to call you and…Oh hold on. I have Glenn Ford on the other line….”

Please forgive the attempted humor in the first caption. I just couldn’t help myself. Readers of Lee Marvin Point Blank will of course get the reference but others probably won’t. In that case, read the book to find out.
Which reminds me of something else I’d like to point out. Several reviewers stated that I was unduly and unnecessarily cruel in my assessment of Ms. Triola and to that I say they should have done the research that I did as that is where the assessment comes from. I didn’t get a chance to interview her, although I made several attempts to do so. Readers know the comments and stories concerning Michele Triola came directly from interviews I conducted with individuals with firsthand knowledge of her and her relationship with Lee. People such as Lee’s palimony lawyer, David Kagon, stuntman Tony Epper, business manager Ed Silver, and many others all went on the record about her and I found it interesting that even though they may not have known each other, they all told similar ribald tales about her. Want to know what they were? Read the book. In the mean time, feel free to check out the contact sheets below….

Contact sheet for unknown Men’s Magazine featuring Michel Triola.

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