MOVIE MAN WAVE ON ITS WAY…AND IT’S NOT THE FIRST TIME

Movie man wave? Whatever it is, it’s on its way, according to an article in Deadline Hollywood. I’m assuming the writer is trying to come up with a new, hip phrase along the lines of “Bro-mance,” or some other term in these days of viral social media. Based on the comment section he appears to be taking his lumps for it, too. Personally, I think ‘movie man wave’ is a terrible term but the movies he’s referring to all sound like winners. From Ford Vs. Ferrari to The Irishman and more, it’s looking to be a great end of the year movie season. Of course, nothing in Hollywood happens as a stand alone as Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood started the current trend last summer.
Truth be told, it’s a trend that actually started as far aback as silent movies, with the likes of What Price Glory? (1926). Some of the best early ones co-starred the likes of James Cagney and Pat O’Brien, or Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy. When I was growing up such films were called ‘Buddy Movies,’ which made more sense than ‘Bro-mance or ‘Man Wave.’

Paul Newman and Lee Marvin may have lacked chemistry in POCKET MONEY but the film did allow for this wonderful candid image of Marvin that remains my favorite.

The actor who made more films in this realm? Probably Lee Marvin, whether as friends, rivals, or downright enemies, he worked with all the other major male stars in that capacity. It’s an impressive list that includes the likes of Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, John Wayne, Charles Bronson, Toshiro Mifune, Jack Palance, Paul Newman, Gene Hackman, Robert Shaw, Richard Burton, Oliver Reed, practically the entire spectrum of male movie stars. The final result often varied in quality but the star power certainly didn’t. And what did Marvin think of this various and divergent list of co-stars? That answer can only be found in detail within the pages of Lee Marvin Point Blank.
– Dwayne Epstein

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LIBERTY VALANCE REDUX? HERE WE GO, AGAIN!

Liberty Valance redux looks to be on its way into production with some slight changes. According do Deadline.com, John Ford’s classic western will now be about the NY Drug Wars of the 1990s.

The 3 principal cast members of THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE (L-R): Jimmy Stewart (Ranse Stoddard), Lee Marvin (Liberty Valance) and John Wayne (Tom Doniphon).

Movie purists will angrily shake their fists at such blasphemy but before they do, there’s some things to keep in mind, so take a deep cleansing breath…..

Liberty Valance toying with his prey on the streets of Shinbone before the big finale.

– John Carpenter did the same with Howard Hawks’ classic western Rio Bravo (1959), by updating it to Assault on Precinct 13 (1976), which itself was later remade in 2005.

– Hawks also bastardized the tale himself over the years with both El Dorado (1967) and Rio Lobo (1970), all three of which starred John Wayne. So much for acting and directing legends maintaining the integrity of their careers.

– Oh, I know Rio Bravo Redux is not Liberty Valance Redux. For the record, it’s also not the first time The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance has had a redux..of a kind. There was a stage play mounted in London a few years back that received surprisingly good reviews.

For Lee Marvin’s opening scene in the film, readers of LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK know the real reason he’s wearing the bandana over his face.

–  Also, an updated remake of Liberty Valance has been bandied about for a while now as I had blogged about it back in 2015. As you can see by the blog entry, I’m certainly not defending the idea of an updated remake. Quite the contrary. It’s just that I think in this day and age we should no longer be either shocked nor surprised by such things. Sadly, it is the way of the world we live in.
Besides, to paraphrase the famous line in the film, “When the truth becomes the legend, (re)print the legend.” Would you expect anything  less from Hollywood?
– Dwayne Epstein

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LIBERTY VALANCE PREMIERES APRIL 13, 1962

On this date in 1962, John Ford’s The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance premiered and it’s production, reception and legacy is fully covered in Lee Marvin Point Blank. Readers will discover how the cast REALLY got along during the filming, what John Ford thought of his new but late-in-the-game stock company member, Lee Marvin, why Lee Marvin’s son considers it his favorite film, what he said when introduced to John Wayne and infinitely more! Most exclusive of all was an interview with the late, great Woody Strode and his personal take on what happened on set and why he loved Lee Marvin.
However, to honor the occasion, here a few strange tidbits from the past to pay tribute to the last great John Wayne/John Ford western that were not included in the book.

Pre-release movie magazine teaser ad for LIBERTY VALANCE.

This strange ad above is the kind of thing you just don’t see any more, and maybe that’s a good thing. What’s with the nursery rhyming scheme? Did the publicity dept, think anxious  film fans would put it to music and sing these little ditties to help promote word-of-mouth? Bizarre. Did these folks even seen the film? Andy Devine’s character of Sheriff Link Appleyard hardly lived to help ‘the ones in need.’ The one for Valance isn’t even accurate. He didn’t spread shame. He spread pain!
Then there’s this ‘Behnd-the-scenes’ article from the June, 1962 issue of Screen Stories.

Screen Stories 1962 article on the making of LIBERTY VALANCE.

You can already tell from the opening that a good portion of it was a result more of p.r. than it was actual onset reporting. That’s fine in the long run, I guess, but it also has some interesting trivia, such as the fact that the entire male cast were each 6-foot tall or taller!
Also has one of my favorite John Ford quotes: “We have a very fine cast of actors in this film, and John Wayne.”

Behind the scenes article, page 2.

And there’s this review, which explains why the movie took a while to get an audience. Not only does the reviewer spell Jimmy Stewart’s name wrong, he commits the ultimate sin of a reviewer by giving away the ending…and then rates the film a C-!

Movie rag…er…mag review of LIBERTY VALANCE.

Is it any wonder I dislike most critics? Ahh well. Never mind the critics. Just enjoy the great film for what it is: One of Lee Marvin’s best performances and a lasting testament to what John Ford contributed to the American Western: When the truth becomes the legend, print the legend.

Smack dab in the center is Lee Marvin in the March, 1962 issue of PARAMOUNT WORLD, promoting the release of Liberty Valance.

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