FEBRUARY 2021 ON TCM

February 2021 is upon us and so is a new list of watchable films for interested Lee Marvin fans. Unfortunately, they are only showing one actual Lee Marvin film for February 2021, but there are a couple of interesting highlights to consider, as well. All times are PST so set your DVRs accordingly…

AVALANCHE EXPRESS (1979): Tuesday, February 2nd, 4:45 am. 

Old style advertising artwork for AVALANCHE EXPRESS, which was infinitely better than the film.


Lee Marvin heads an all-star cast of Robert Shaw, Maximillian Schell, Linda Evans, Horst Bucholtz, Mike Connors and Joe Namath in this Cold War thriller that’s part dated spy film and part creaky disaster film. Marvin had been off-screen for a few years and he effect is jarring as he looked infinitely older than his mid-fifties. The production was fraught with disaster itself, including the untimely death of both the film’s director Mark Robson and costar Shaw. Readers of LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK discovered the truth behind the finished film and the input of filmmaker Monte Hellman. Like any Lee Marvin project, though, it’s still worth viewing. 

THE RISE & FALL OF LEGS DIAMOND (1960): Friday, February 5th, 6:30 am. Dashing Ray Danton stars as the title character in this classic genre film that also proved to be the film debuts of both Dyann Cannon and Warren Oates. The Marvin connection? The film was directed by Budd Boetticher, known largely for his cult westerns starring Randolph Scott, his contribution to Marvin’s filmography gave the actor’s career a major boost. As he told yours truly in an exclusive interview, “I directed a couple of westerns and they typecast me as western director. After Legs Diamond they called me a gangster director. Go figure.” Check it out and see how veteran filmmaker put his touch on the tommy guns and molls entry.


IN COLD BLOOD (1967): Monday, February 15th, 5pm.

IN COLD BLOOD writer/director Richard Brooks (behind the camera) and cinematographer Conrad Hall behinds Brooks.


Writer/director Richard Brooks brought this Truman Capote true-crime thriller to the screen with bone-chilling reality. Shot on actual locations by Conrad Hall in stark black & white and starring Robert Blake and Scott Wilson as Dick and Perry, the Marvin connection had been recounted here the last time TCM aired the film. Watch it again but by all means, leave the lights on!

THE PAWNBROKER (1965): Wednesday, February, 17th, 6:45 pm.  
Marvin won his only Oscar for Cat Ballou (1965) but the odds on favorite that year had been Rod Steiger who plays this film’s title character. As concentration camp survivor Sol Nazerman, Steiger gives an emotionally powerful performance as a New York City pawnbroker grappling with his memories of the camp. He seemed a shoo-in for the Best Actor statue but we all know what happened that night. Marvin’s wife had other plans, Marvin himself had a plan for Steiger and the cherry on the sundae happened after the show at a nearby traffic light, all recounted in LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK. So, watch The Pawnbroker and see for yourself who was more deserving of the award that year. 

Lee Marvin backstage after winning his Oscar.



In other TCM news the Star of the Month is the great John Garfield and that alone makes for wonderful viewing. Check listings for film titles and times. So there you have February 2021 on TCM. Until next month, stay safe and enjoy classic movies!

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LEE MARVIN: IN COLD BLOOD

I recently watched the 1967 classic true-crime thriller In Cold Blood on TCM and it still packs one hell of a wallop. Writer/Director Richard Brooks was at the peak of his game in his stark tale of the horrific murders of the Clutter family at the hands of ex-con drifters Perry Smith (Robert Blake) and Dick Hickox (Scott Wilson). As readers of Lee Marvin Point Blank know, Marvin himself came pretty damned close to being in the film.
How close? From the IMDb: “Lee Marvin wanted the role of Alvin Dewey but director Richard Brooks gave it to John Forsythe instead. Brooks had worked with Marvin on the extremely successful, The Professionals.  but Marvin had proved to be a handful on the set.”

L-R: Veteran character actor James Flavin, Robert Blake, Gerald S. O’loughlin, John Forsythe (in the role Marvin was to play) & Scott Wilson in Richard Brooks’ true crime thriller, IN COLD BLOOD.

I’m not quite sure where the IMDb got its information from but I had interviewed stuntman Tony Epper, who had worked very closely with Brooks and Marvin on The Professionals. His version of why Marvin was not in the film was quite different. While it’s true Marvin and Brooks did not always get along, both men were well aware of each other’s  personality traits and it was Marvin, not Brooks, who did not want to work with the other. Marvin thought of Brooks as a martinet who may have been a military veteran, but having not seen actual combat, he considered Brooks a phony and a bully. Unfortunate really as it was another golden opportunity that Marvin missed in being a part of portraying the horror of violence on film as never seen before at that time.

Lee Marvin as Detective Frank Ballinger on M Squad, or, as I like to think of it, how he would have appeared in the John Forsythe role for IN COLD BLOOD.

Tony Epper: “I’ll tell you what Lee did. I came over and Lee said ‘Go get some of that good wine at the liquor store.’ It was a different label, that’s all. Other than that, after the third drink, you know. Anyway, I get a phone call. I lived down in the valley in those days. It’s Richard. I remember Tommy Shaw, who was the production manager, in those days. He was a good production manager. Anyway, Brooks wanted to get the script of In Cold Blood to Tommy. He had called Tommy and Tommy couldn’t come. I took it, because his wife had a liver problem. That’s where the money went. Anyway, I went over and that’s when Brooks was still with Jean Simmons. He and I were good friends. Nothing but good friends…Anyway, I go in the house and there’s Richard. He says, ‘I want you to do me a big favor.’ I said ‘Do you want me to kill somebody?’ (laughs) He gives me the script. Lots of seals all over it. I stopped by Lee’s with the script and the bottle he wanted. Anyway, this part was Lee’s idea. He saw the sealed script I was to deliver to Shaw, and since he knew Brooks was so paranoid about anybody reading his script, he came up with this idea. He said, ‘Let’s just break the seal before giving it to Shaw.’ I asked Lee if he wanted to read it first. We never read it, just broke the seal. Brooks, until the day he died, kept asking me if we had ever read the script to In Cold Blood. I think that’s why he changed his mind about offering the role to Lee.”
– Dwayne Epstein

IN COLD BLOOD writer/director Richard Brooks (behind the camera) and cinematographer Conrad Hall behinds Brooks.

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