THE UK TELEGRAPH ON LEE MARVIN RECENTLY

The UK Telegraph, the major newspaper of the United Kingdom, recently published a fairly lengthy article by Martin Chilton focusing mainly on the actor’s singing of “Wandering’ Star” in Paint Your Wagon (1969). The article can be found here and it’s fairly entertaining.
To his credit, writer Martin Chilton uncovered some interesting factoids I was not aware of, such as the quotes from Nelson Riddle’s son, Christopher Riddle, and a few other tidbits.

Famed photographer Bob Willoughby captured Lee Marvin with his infrared lens on location for Paint Your Wagon.

To his discredit, he also got some things obviously wrong. Normally I wouldn’t mind but since the author chose to mention me and my book, Lee Marvin: Point Blank, I think it best to set the record straight, as is my way:

Lee Marvin & Clint Eastwood early in the film also captured by Bob Willoughby.

– Marvin was never, repeat, never in the army. That is the last thing you would ever want to mix-up in the presence of a Marine. Nor are the Marines affiliated with the Navy, as one person commented. The USMC is and always has been an autonomous branch of the U.S. military.
– He also did not have his sciatic nerve severed on Saipan but NEARLY had it severed. The 13 months of convalescence was bad enough but had it been severed, he’d never be able to walk again.
– His entry into theatre wasn’t quite a lark but a calculated stumble into a series of events.
– Betty Marvin, Lee’s first wife, was not trained as an opera singer but trained in musical comedy at UCLA by MGM musical director Roger Edens. The requirements are quite different.
– The photo of Marvin and his costar from The Dirty Dozen misspells Charles Bronson as BROSNAN. Wonder how Pierce feels about that?
I’m rather surprised that the UK Telegraph didn’t bring up the urban legend about Marvin and Captain Kangaroo and revive that old chestnut like a Walking Dead zombie.
Bottom line, as always, if you want the straight, hard, and fascinating facts behind Lee Marvin’s life, career and legacy, read Lee Marvin Point Blank. Then we’ll talk.
– Dwayne Epstein

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MOVIE MAN WAVE ON ITS WAY…AND IT’S NOT THE FIRST TIME

Movie man wave? Whatever it is, it’s on its way, according to an article in Deadline Hollywood. I’m assuming the writer is trying to come up with a new, hip phrase along the lines of “Bro-mance,” or some other term in these days of viral social media. Based on the comment section he appears to be taking his lumps for it, too. Personally, I think ‘movie man wave’ is a terrible term but the movies he’s referring to all sound like winners. From Ford Vs. Ferrari to The Irishman and more, it’s looking to be a great end of the year movie season. Of course, nothing in Hollywood happens as a stand alone as Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood started the current trend last summer.
Truth be told, it’s a trend that actually started as far aback as silent movies, with the likes of What Price Glory? (1926). Some of the best early ones co-starred the likes of James Cagney and Pat O’Brien, or Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy. When I was growing up such films were called ‘Buddy Movies,’ which made more sense than ‘Bro-mance or ‘Man Wave.’

Paul Newman and Lee Marvin may have lacked chemistry in POCKET MONEY but the film did allow for this wonderful candid image of Marvin that remains my favorite.

The actor who made more films in this realm? Probably Lee Marvin, whether as friends, rivals, or downright enemies, he worked with all the other major male stars in that capacity. It’s an impressive list that includes the likes of Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, John Wayne, Charles Bronson, Toshiro Mifune, Jack Palance, Paul Newman, Gene Hackman, Robert Shaw, Richard Burton, Oliver Reed, practically the entire spectrum of male movie stars. The final result often varied in quality but the star power certainly didn’t. And what did Marvin think of this various and divergent list of co-stars? That answer can only be found in detail within the pages of Lee Marvin Point Blank.
– Dwayne Epstein

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CELEBRATE THE 4TH WITH THE DOZEN

Celebrate the 4th with the dozen, a Dirty Dozen, that is. Such is the game plan I came across on line, recently.

Celebrate the 4th with he one, the only, the original, DIRTY DOZEN (1967)

A writer at the venerable Chicago Tribune (former home base for the late Gene Siskel) came up with the interesting concept of what all-American films would be worthy of Independence Day. Some obvious ones were included, such as 1776, and some were a bit of a stretch, like his first choice of The Godfather. Surprisingly, he didn’t include my go-to choice each 4th of July which is Yankee Doodle Dandy with the great James Cagney in his Oscar winning role as George M. Cohan.
The Tribune writer, Rex Crum, explains his concept here. If you don’t care to scroll the entire article, here’s his reasoning to celebrate the 4th with the Dozen:

“Did you know that in addition to leading Jim Brown, Charles Bronson, Donald Sutherland and nine other American military convicts on a crazy raid against the Nazis, Lee Marvin actually fought in World War II and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery? If that doesn’t just scream “AMERICA!” then nothing does.
How To Watch: Invest $2.99 and stream “The Dirty Dozen” on iTunes. You’ll be glad you did.”

…..And there you have it. Interesting idea, don’t you think? Could even make a drinking game out of it. How you ask? How about this: every time a Nazi gets killed, you do a shot. Of course, by the explosive finale, you might as well just shake up a bunch of beers and spritz everyone in the room like a winning world series ball team.

Better yet, have a more relaxing time this 4th of July avoiding the crowds and noisy fireworks by reading Lee Marvin Point Blank. You can’t get more American than that.
– Dwayne Epstein

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