CLINT WALKER’S PASSING ONE YEAR AGO

Clint Walker’s passing occurred a year ago and as such, karma had a say in such things. I was browsing at a used bookstore a day or two ago and came across a copy of SCREEN WORLD 1959, the annual journal of films on a given year. I was missing that particular one so I picked it up, opened it to peruse and came across this page first…..

First page I came to in SCREEN WORLD 1959.

 

Pretty amazing timing considering I came across it almost a year to the day of Clint Walker’s passing. Consequently, he’s been on my mind a lot, lately. At the time of Clint Walker’s passing last year, I did blog about it. Since then, some interesting things have transpired.
To start with, I was most fortunate to meet Walker the first time at the the Beverly Garland Hotel (GREAT lady, by the way) at one of her Hollywood Collector Shows back in the 1990s. He agreed to be interviewed for what eventually would become Lee Marvin Point Blank and his stories on making The Dirty Dozen (1967) and the follow-up of sorts, Small Soldiers (1998), were priceless! His anecdotes on Trini Lopez on both projects are unintentionally hilarious.

Clint Walker tangles with Lee Marvin in THE DIRTY DOZEN.

A few years back I had the idea of interviewing him again, but this time it would be about his entire career for Filmfax Magazine. I discovered the best way to contact him was to connect with Deb Elsie, who handled his online presence. Once we spoke and she then contacted him, I took no small amount of pride, in this exchange from her: “He told me to give you his phone number and in all the years I’ve known him, he’s never told me to give someone his phone number. …..Dwayne, I’m super excited about this!!! Especially since it wasn’t that long ago Clint said he wasn’t interested in doing any more interviews. I know he trusts you and so anything you need, I’m here to help.”
The interview went well, I sent it to Filmfax, and liked the response it garnered upon publication. When it came out, I received much praise from his fans via social media and something I never expected. Author and historian Jeff Thompson read it and contacted me about something Clint Walker had said concerning a TV-move he made for Dan Curtis. Curtis, the creator of the cult TV show Dark Shadows (among MANY other things), was chronicled in several books by Thompson who had not known Walker’s input on the project entitled, Scream of the Wolf, that is until he read my interview. He contacted me….

Original TV Guide ad for Dan Curtis’ SCREAM OF THE WOLF (1974).

“I am finishing up the revised second edition of my first book THE TELEVISION HORRORS OF DAN CURTIS for McFarland. I would like to quote your interview in my book thusly:

Jeff Thompson’s original work on Dan Curtis to be updated and released later this year with quotes from your truly’s interview with Clint Walker.

In a 2017 Filmfax interview, Clint Walker (1927-2018) revealed that he almost did not get the part. He explained, They wanted Jack Palance for it, but he wanted more money, and they didn’t want to pay it. So I said to my agent, “Let me talk to them.” I wanted to be the heavy. I said, “If you get Jack Palance, he’s a very fine actor and all, but people are going to know immediately that he’s the bad guy. With me, they’re not going to think of me in those terms until the last minute.” [Scream of the Wolf] was interesting.”

It just goes to prove you never know how one’s work may be perceived, or for that matter, live on beyond inception. I look forward to seeing Jeff’s book, and when it comes to work living on beyond inception, few have done so as well as the canon of work of Clint Walker. He was often a good guy on small and big screen alike but more importantly, he was a good guy in real life. Farewell Cheyenne.
-Dwayne Epstein

Clint Walker as Cheynne Bodie, The way he would want to be remembered. R.I.P.

Share

STEVE ALLEN OUTRE INTERVIEW, PART 1

Steve Allen
Steve Allen being a personal hero of mine, I was over the moon when he agreed to be interviewed by yours truly for Outre’ Magazine back in 1997. I  met him and his wife Jayne Meadows at one of those Hollywood Collector’s Shows at the Beverly Garland Hotel in which Ms. Meadows worked the room and Mr. Allen was suprisingly subdued. I was there to collect as well, mostly interviews for my book, Lee Marvin Point Blank (which for the record proved a great source, such as Robert Vaughn, Clint Walker, John Dennis and Ms. Garland herself!)
Mr. Allen, I later was to discover, was subdued due to the fact that he didn’t want to be there. When I discussed the possibilty of my interviewing him, he lit up like the proverbial Christmas tree. We exchanged contact info and I checked in with Outre’s publisher Mike Stein, who loved the idea. The dilemma then became what the hell do I talk to him about? I need not have worried since Mr. Allen was a wealth of stories and anecdotes — from Elvis Presley and Bob Dylan to Lenny Bruce and Jack Kerouac — all of which provided me with a natural theme for the interview that practically wrote itself, title included. He even went so far as to give me an anecdote about Lee Marvin! The man was something else!

Steve Allen interview, page 1

Steve Allen interview, page 1

Steve Allen interview, page 2

Steve Allen interview, page 2

Steve Allen interview, page 3

Steve Allen interview, page 3

Steve Allen interview, page 4

Steve Allen interview, page 4

Steve Allen interview, page 5

Steve Allen interview, page 5

Steve Allen interview, page 6

Steve Allen interview, page 6

Steve Allen interview, page 7

Steve Allen interview, page 7

 

Share

LEE TV SHOWS: MARVIN ON TELEVISION

Lee’s TV Show appearance: From the earliest days of live television to the the TV-movies of the late 1980s, Lee Marvin had been a permanent fixture in America’s living rooms in spite of his screen success. An entire chapter of Lee Marvin Point Blank is dedicated to his TV performances in which he proved to be more versatile than he ever was on the big screen. Rather ironic considering he hated the medium of television. His versatility allowed him to do such things as …..

lastrenuinionplay romantic love scenes as shown above with Patricia Donahue in “The Last Reunion” episode of GENERAL ELECTRIC THEATER.

He gave a poignant performance as a brain damaged boxer who must choose between the age-old conflict of his life or his pride in boxer

THE SCHILTZ PLAYHOUSE episode from September 1959 entitled “A Fistful Of Love.”

As manned space flight became a reality, he also played a troubled astronaut alongside E.G. Marshall inorbit

 

The DESILU PLAYHOUSE production entitled “Man In Orbit” in May of 1959.

His physical appearance had him playing bad guys in westerns in the movies but on TV he played

colgatewesterna western drifter in the title role of “The Easy-Going Man” episode of NBC’s COLGATE WESTERN THEATER.

As his success slowly grew, he was not above appearing in other types of shows simply as himself, such as

gameshowa short-lived game show entitled YOU DON’T SAY with host Tom Kennedy (center) and fellow celebrity contestant, Beverly Garland.

Even after his film success in the mid-sixties he continued to make appearances on such unlikely venues as

bobhopeBob Hope’s comedy specials and as a host of a 1976 TV special highlighting the work of

stuntsof such legendary stuntmen as Dar Robinson (right).

 

 

 

 

 

Share