LEE MARVIN & THE LADIES: ROMANCE?

The allegations against Harvey Weinstein are far from being considered a ‘romance’ but what is it called if flirtations or mutual feelings develop between costars? For Lee Marvin, who only had true romantic leads opposite female costars in only a handful films, the known results of a possible romance are three, based on my research. Of course, there may even be more as Marvin knew the meaning of discretion. As Betty Marvin told me, he was known to have fallen off the fidelity during their marriage but it was never anything one would consider a romance.
Who were the known three? Well, Lee Marvin Point Blank readers know with as much details as I was able to get.

Co-star Barbara Luna at the time she appeared in SHIP OF FOOLS.

Prior to my research, most Lee Marvin fans only knew the version of how he an Michele Triola met on the set of Ship of Fools based on what she told the media leading up to the palimony suit. The truth, however, as witnessed by such participants as Barbara Luna and friend Ralph O’Hara, is VERY different and exclusively documented in my research.

Lee and Michelle shortly after they began dating during SHIP OF FOOLS.

Then of course there’s the amazing Angie Dickinson. I was extremely fortunate enough to spend the day with her during my research and the results were fascinating. She worked with Lee more than any other actress, and to my mind, that was no accident (M Squad, The Killers, Point Blank, Death Hunt, and several Bob Hope TV specials).

Lee and Angie in THE KILLERS, their first film together.

I can’t really add anything here to what I already wrote in the book, other than the surprising results of an interview I considered a holy grail and was forewarned about by the A&E Biography producers. It was how I finally met her in-person and was told she wasn’t very forthcoming for their purposes. Naturally, that made me a little reticent when I finally sat down with here, especially since I wasn’t sure if there were aspects about her life & career that may put her off, such as the JFK assassination that happened just prior to The Killers. Believe it or not, she did indeed open up about that period, at least to the extent that it had to do with the project and Lee. Everything that she told me went in the book, or later, posted here in a previous blog entry. The only thing I can add is what Christopher Marvin told me off-the-record that I can now post here. He volunteered the following encapsulation: “Angie and my dad…WOW!” He didn’t elaborate of course, but truth be told, I  didn’t think he had to.
Lastly, there was a costar who proved to be not only Lee Marvin’s one true moment of onscreen romance, but even more so offscreen. Marvin went out of his way to get the actress to agree to costar with him and when she relented after he came to Paris, the results were true sparks in front of and behind the camera…

Contact sheet images of Jeanne Moreau and Lee Marvin while making MONTE WALSH.

The images from onset candid photographs included here tell the story better than any words can possibly convey. The look on Lee’s face as he talks to her, the way she brushes  his hair back, even the fact that they are completely oblivious to director William Fraker walking behind them, says volumes.

Jeanne Moreau brushes Marvin’s hair back while they speak.

MONTE WALSH director William Fraker walks behind Marvin & Moreau completely unobserved.

Costars such as Mitch Ryan and others were aware of the chemistry between the two stars, as were some of Marvin’s closest confidantes. In fact, when Marvin surprised his associates by announcing his marriage to Woodstock’s Pam Feeley after the film wrapped, the biggest surprised was that it wasn’t Moreau. According to Mitch Ryan, they actually discussed it but as Ryan said, Marvin didn’t want to move to Paris: “Can you see me living in Paris?” he told him.
Since Moreau proved to be his most romantic leading lady onscreen, and their scenes together are some of the best in the film, it does make you wonder: What would have happened if he had more romance onscreen than gunplay? Sadly, we’ll never ever know.
– Dwayne Epstein

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DRUNK DRIVING WITH LEE MARVIN…AND FRIENDS

L.A. Herald-Examiner article covering Lee Marvin’s 1965 drunk driving arrest.

Biographers have to make choices in terms of what to leave in and what to leave out, and in writing Lee Marvin Point Blank, one of the toughest choices concerned Lee Marvin’s drinking, especially when it came to drunk driving. Like the author, readers may find it fun at first, but after awhile it leaves a bad taste in one’s mouth. I cut back considerably, keeping in mind what would be enough to make the point that Marvin had a problem versus turning off the reader, entirely.
Lee’s agent, Meyer Mishkin, and his lawyer, Lou Goldman, did what they could to keep the public from knowing but some times, it boiled over into the mainstream press. Mishkin showed me the court order dated December 30, 1965: “To Lee Marvin — Order of probation. The records of this department show that you are a negligent driver and that you have violated the traffic laws and have been involved in an accident. Therefore, as provided in section 14103 of the Vehicle code, you are herby notified that you are being placed on probation by this department. This order is effective January 3, 1966 to July 2. You must obey the provisions of the vehicle code of California and all traffic regulations. You must send all licenses in your possession to this department for probation.”
Another newspaper showed a full version of the photo taken at the time…

The full image of actor Lee Marvin shown in handcuffs and being interviewed for local TV at the time of his drunk driving arrest.

According first wife, Betty Marvin: “He could be totally out of control. Once, I was devastated. He was driving down some back road near MGM and he hit some guy [Robert Hathaway] on a motorcycle. You know the story? He accused the guy on the bike of deliberately getting in his path so he could get a part in a movie. Lee thought the guy planned the whole thing.”

Not known to the general public was such stories as the following, also told by Betty Marvin: “I’ll tell you one day that was absolutely shocking to me. We had been to the beach. It was a beautiful warm day. We had been swimming and we came back. He said, ‘It’s such a beautiful day, let’s put the top down and go to the Luau Bar and have a rum drink.’ I said, ‘Oh, okay.’ We get dressed and we invited our neighbors, who were quite conservative. He was Paul Fix the character actor, and his wife Beverly. Lee called them: ‘C’mon Uncle Paul. We’re just going to go the Luau and have a rum on me.’ I’m thinking, ‘One rum, uh-huh.’ Bright sunny day. We go in and immediately he has two or three strong drinks and a few appetizers. I’m thinking we better get home because the babies are coming home from school or whatever. We have to go. I will never forget it. It was about 4:30 or 5 in the afternoon. We are at the intersection of Wilshire and Westwood Blvd. Traffic is crazy. Of course Lee insisted on driving. ‘Sweetheart let me drive.’ ‘No, I’m driving!” Beverly and Paul are in the back and we’re driving in this big convertible and we had the top down. Of course he runs right block past Westwood Blvd. He gets out of the car. Here’s this woman sitting in her seat. She’d just been hit like this. [Slaps her hand]. He said to her, “Start your car and drive away from here or I’ll kill you!’ She is just beside herself. She drives on, you know the cops are coming. We drive away. He says, ‘I don’t want to talk about it. That’s it.’ The phone rings the next morning. Of course, he has hit the executive secretary to the head of the studio at MGM, I think it was. That’s who he hits. He’s ready to sue him, right? They had to quickly settle that. I must say, Meyer had his work cut out for him.”

 

 

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‘FEUD’S ROBERT ALDRICH, JOAN CRAWFORD & LEE MARVIN

From the NY Times, March 12, 2016: After a tough day shooting “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?,” director Robert Aldrich complains to his wife (Molly Price) that his two stars — Bette Davis and Joan Crawford — have ganged up on him, undermining his power on the set. He seethes that Jack Palance and Lee Marvin would never have resorted to such maneuvers. His wife replies flatly: “They don’t have to. They’re men.”

The original cast of “Feud” (L-R): Bette Davis, Jack Warner, Joan Crawford and Robert Aldrich.

That line is one of the points of this week’s episode of “Feud: Bette and Joan.” The show so far is at its best when it examines the different ways in which power operates, and the different ways in which power is perceived. As Aldrich’s wife observes, when men fight for something (or fight with one another), it’s perceived as business as usual. When women fight, they’re perceived as being difficult, petty, or “catty.”

I’ve been fascinated with this original cable series and the Lee Marvin reference in the second episode got me to thinking. In Lee Marvin Point Blank readers are fully aware of the connection between Lee Marvin and Robert Aldrich. He directed Lee in 3 different decades and the films Attack! (1956), The Dirty Dozen (1967) and Emperor of the North (1973) are fully explored. However, there’s one anecdote from Attack! costar Eddie Albert that shows a side of Aldrich not yet mentioned on the series that so far has portrayed him as rather dominated and put-upon. From my interview with the late, great Eddie Albert:

Director Robert Aldrich’s ATTACK! co-stars Lee Marvin and the ‘late’ William Smithers.

“I remember one thing about him. We were just starting Attack! We had rehearsed for a week. I think it was a Monday and we were all there. But the kid from New York, I’ve forgotten his name…he was a leading part. He played the main solider. …William Smithers! Anyway, he was about 15-20 minutes late and Aldrich didn’t say anything. Tuesday came and he was 20 minutes late again. Aldrich said, ‘I want to have a conference.’ He said, ‘Now, this is very difficult. We have problems. We have all got to work together…’ He went on very beautifully and then stopped, pointed to the actor and yelled, ‘Now you cocksuckers that come in late, I am going to kick the shit right out of you!’ I never heard him explode like that. The kid was never late again. ‘I’ll run your ass right out of this town…!’

To my knowledge, Marvin never encountered Jack Warner but he did almost work with Bette Davis on a film called Bunny O’ Hare (1971that was made instead with his frequent costar, Ernest Borgnine.
However, he did have a memorable run-in with Joan Crawford. According to Lee’s first wife, Betty Marvin, who had worked for Crawford as her nanny (the Mommie Dearest stories are true, by the way), the run-in took place at the premiere of Lee’s film, Raintree County (1957). In Betty’s own words:

“At the the premiere Lee and I were lined up. Big joke in those days. So there we were, and who’s behind us? Joan Crawford. She, in her wonderfull style, looks right through me… Because Lee was like the next big star on the horizon and on, and on..The next day, comes this script. I thought, “Oh isn’t this interesting.” She wants him to co-star in her next film and would he please read the script and set up an appointment at MCA. I said to myself, ‘Here we go.’ She calls. Talks right through me. ‘Is Lee there? Why don’t you come over. We’ll go over the script in my office and read it together.’ He said, ‘Okay.’ He left about one o’clock. You know, I was a young wife. It made me very uncomfortable.

Newlyweds Betty and Lee Marvin around the time Lee was offered a ‘role’ opposite Betty’s former employer, Joan Crawford.

What’s going on here? The whole afternoon, it was difficult for me. When he came back, he was laughing. I said, ‘How did he go? Are you going to co-star with Joan Crawford?’ He said, ‘Oh, hardly.’ I asked if he read the script. He was a very slow reader, as I told you. He had went into a room with the script and she was waiting. After about two hours, she said, ‘Well?’ He said, ‘Listen, it takes a long time to get through this crap.’ Once again, you know? He was like Give me a break.’ Oh she was livid! That was Lee’s lovely way. And I’m not saying out of respect for me. He didn’t like her crappy script because she was doing a lot of garbage.”

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