About Dwayne Epstein

Dwayne Epstein is the author of a number of young adult biographies, covering such celebrity personalities as Adam Sandler, Will Ferrell, Hilary Swank, Nancy Pelosi, Hillary Clinton and Denzel Washington for Lucent Books’ “People in the News” series. Epstein also contributed to Bill Krohn’s bestselling books “Hitchcock at Work” and “Joe Dante and the Gremlins of Hollywood.”Prior to writing biographies, Epstein contributed to film chronicles on a regular basis. He wrote for Filmfax Magazine on subjects such as Bobby Darin, the Rat Pack, television pioneer Steve Allen, film director Sam Fuller, comic book artist Neal Adams, “Invasion of the Body Snatcher’s” Kevin McCarthy, John Belushi and comedy legend Sid Caesar. Epstein later contributed to Cahiers Du Cinema’s “Serious Pleasures” which had a high profile in Europe. He wrote on American films chosen for rediscovery by directors Oliver Stone, Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood. Early in his career, Epstein earned his first professional writing credit reviewing films for Hearst Community Newspapers. Epstein was born in New York’s Coney Island in 1960, and moved West with his family at age 8, spending the rest of his childhood in Cerritos, Calif. He moved back east, attended Mercer Community College in New Jersey, and also served as an assistant editor for the five area newspapers of Cranbury Publications. Epstein made one more cross-country move and currently resides in Long Beach, Calif. When he is not writing, he enjoys watching and reading about movies and collecting soundtracks.

LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK HARDCOVER GOING OUT OF PRINT

A recent conversation with my publisher, Tim Schaffner of Schaffner Press, resulted in the discovery that when the Lee Marvin Point Blank hardcover sells out of copies, it will NOT be going back for another print run. Matter of fact, he told me that he won’t be doing any future titles in hardcover. as all titles will be done in paperback.
By the way, if you didn’t know it (as I didn’t until my publisher told me), when you remove the dust jacket, there’s a pretty cool graphic added to it by graphic artist, Jake Kiehle, that is exclusive to the hardcover. Sort of the cherry on the sundae as my publisher called it…

Hard cover of LEE MARVIN: POINT BLANK minus the dust jacket.

To put it more succinctly, once the hardcover is gone, it is gone! That, by the way, is not an entirely bad thing.  It increases my royalties as the sales numbers pass a certain threshold amount. Also, when the hardcover sells out, it makes it a bona fide one-of-a-kind collectible.
I’d like to be able to say that I was in a position to make some sort of promotional offer in order to help boost those sales but unfortunately, I’m not. I can, however, make another ‘kind’ of offer in an effort to boost sales. If you purchase the hardcover, I will personally send you the following: A sticker for the cover denoting the bronze “IPPY” award in the Biography category it earned in 2013, as seen pictured herein.

2-inch bronze foil sticker indicating LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK’S win of The Independent Publisher Book Awards in 2013.

Since I can’t personally sign every Point Blank hardcover copy purchased, I can do the next best thing. Another give-away I can offer is a personally signed postcard. I was on the A&E biography of Lee (back in 2001) when I was still diligently researching his life and was given these promotional postcards after it aired. I will personally sign and send one to anyone free of charge!

Lee Marvin, shown on the set of THE DIRTY DOZEN, on the card used to advertise the Emmy-winning 2001 episode of A&E’s biography of the actor, featuring the author of LEE MARVIN POINT BLANK.

If you prefer, I have a bunch of other postcards I can sign from a book signing I did at a northern California bookstore called Loveable Rogue that is no longer in existence, unfortunately. Of course, that would make it a collectible of a kind, as well. Just let me know which one you prefer and I’ll accommodate your request. Must act soon as I have a limited amount of stickers and postcards.

Front & back view of cards printed up for the “Loveable Rogue book signing in Novato, Calif.

 

 

The hardcover can be purchased on line on several sites but make sure you’re ordering the Point Blank hardcover and not the Kindle or paperback. Links to such sites are highlighted here in blue and you can simply click on it and it’ll take you right to it.
The price Amazon is charging is $14.65 which is 48% less than the cover but they’re low on inventory at present. Barnes & Noble is priced $18.95 which is 32% less than the cover price. The same with the Books-A-Million (BAM!) price.

  • One last reason to consider the hardcover. August 29th of this year will mark the 30th anniversary of Lee Marvin’s passing. Since he is no longer with us, I think there may be no better way to honor his passing than with the purchase of a book that will also soon no longer be with us. Just a thought.
    Anyone interested in taking me up on my offer can simply message me here as shown below. Thanks for looking and long live the memory of the great Lee Marvin!
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LEE MARVIN: FACING EVIL

A key aspect in researching Lee Marvin Point Blank was discovering an appropriate theme, and in the case of Lee Marvin, that theme emerged as his screen persona’s involvement in facing evil. He knew about facing evil from his time in the USMC, of course, but it would be some time later in which he could articulate what that meant to him through his acting career.
In the early 1960s, Marvin met Dr. Harry Willner when the actor was cast in the TV drama “People Need People.” It was based on Willner’s breakthrough experiences using group therapy to help traumatized war veterans. Marvin gave a harrowing, Emmy-nominated performance. He also became good friends with Willner, and helped him launch a version of the story to help prisoners in San Quentin!
Over the years, WIllner and Marvin continued to stay in touch and on occasion, helped each other with various projects, which included helping young veterans deal with their own PTSD. Shortly before his death, Marvin agreed to speak at a conference WIllner organized on the subject of facing evil, later compiled in a book WIllner published of the same name. Below, are Marvin’s comments which Willner used as the book’s dedication. The actor was articulate, thoughtful and, as his words bear out, highly insightful when it comes to facing evil….

The cover of Dr. Harry Willner’s compendium, FACING EVIL.

Lee Marvin’s comments from his talk at Harry Williner’s conference, one of the actor’s last public appearances.

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JIM JARMUSCH AND THE SONS OF LEE MARVIN

Picture this: I’m in the earliest stages of researching Lee Marvin Point Blank, standing in the middle of the public library, when I read the Film Comment article written by director Jim Jarmusch that reveals the first mention I’ve ever heard concerning the Sons of Lee Marvin. I was still slightly on the fence at the time about whether I should undertake the project at all, that is unti I read Jarmusch’s article.
Being a lifelong film buff I had read much about the legacy of film stars following their passing. The cult surrounding stars such as Marilyn Monroe, Humphrey Bogart, James Dean and others are well know to myself and the general public. Such reverence is often shown via film revivals, books and other venues. However, in all the years I have encountered such things I have never encountered anything as what Jarmusch talks about in his unveiling of the Sons Of Lee Marvin. It literally made me laugh out loud when he retold the anecdote concerning fellow member Tom Waits and the real son of Lee Marvin. I was shushed by the librarian and warned if I repeat the guffaw I’d be asked to leave. I acquiesced to the glares and stares of the other patrons but figured in my head, what the hell, it was worth it. My appreciation of Marvin expanded and my curiosity deepened. Quite simply, the more I found out about him, the more I liked him.
This article, by the way, was part of series in Film Comment in which film makers were asked to list their “Guilty Pleasures,” films they know are bad but they like anyway and with a given reason. Jarmusch dedicates one 10th of his entire list to his favorite Marvin films! So, without further ado, below is the original article that helped pushed me over the edge into dedicating myself to researching and writing Lee Marvin Point Blank.
Oh, and by the way, the story about Waits and Christopher Marvin is pure b.s. but sounds great, doesn’t it? If you want to know the truth, from Christopher Marvin himself. you gotta read Lee Marvin Point Blank.

The original article by Jim Jarmusch in Film Comment.

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